Seiyashi

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Everything posted by Seiyashi

  1. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    I am also announcing my intai from Guess Ura's Aite (and more generally, heavy posting on the forum like the PDY thread). Much like Sakura, I've started a new job over the past year that has gradually left me with less energy and less control over my spare time; I have not been able to get enthused and up to date about the last two basho also for a variety of reasons. It's gotten to the point where I'm forgetting to post my entry as can be seen from the two fusen I have this basho. I'll still be lurking and keeping in touch wih what happens in the kakkai generally, and will still try and drop by a basho in Japan at some point, but can't guarantee that I can follow along with any particular basho.
  2. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    12: Kotoshōhō
  3. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    11 Daieishō
  4. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    10: Abi
  5. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    Day 9: Shōnannoumi
  6. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    7. Takanoshō
  7. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    6. Mitakeumi
  8. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    5. Nishikigi
  9. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    Day 4: Midorifuji
  10. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    3. Ōnoshō About the energy level thing, I completely didn't feel it last basho cos of the Miyagino thing and a rank newbie taking the yūshō. The near triple absences this basho nearly did it for me too.
  11. EDITORIAL NOTE: This thread is unfortunately on hiatus as I haven't had the time/energy to finish it. I hope to get back to it someday but in the meantime please be patient; if you have a burning question on the origin of a particular shikona, DM me and I'll try to respond. Inspired by the Endless Romanisation thread some time ago, @Asojima and I bring to you: The Shikona Translations & Trivia Megathread! Originally this thread contained a list of sekitori shikona. Each shikona is followed by a spoiler tag, which contains the following information pertaining to the shikona: However, after the initial postings, various facts of shikona lore (and the relative insignificance of the translations) became apparent. We are therefore updating the original data sets to better show how sekitori shikona are formed from heya traditions, hometown allusions, and personal references; a project that we expect to take some time. In the meantime, the original lists are archived at the following link within the thread. The new format, split into three blocks, is as follows. The more salient parts are the first and second bits, which actually relate to the shikona's formation; the translations have been relegated to the third part as an archive of work done and a rough idea of the meaning of the kanji, although as noted below they do not necessarily denote what the shikona means to the rikishi. This overhaul also introduces two changes: annotations and traditional Hepburn romaji. As this is a fair amount of visual clutter, the annotations will be confined to the Shikona History section of each rikishi's entry, while traditional Hepburn romaji will be included for the rikishi's real name and full shikona at the top of the entry if applicable. Annotations follow in the following form: * (asterisk): Denotes a heya component of a shikona. ^ (carat): Denotes a geographical component of a shikona. ' (apostrophe): Denotes a personal component of a shikona (whether a reference to the rikishi's real name or other reference to events in their life). Parentheses group together separate kanji in a shikona that belong to the same component. For instance, one might see an annotation thus: Koto*-(te-bakari)'. This indicates that there are three kanji in the shikona, that the "koto" element is a heya component, and the two kanji for "tebakari" together are derived from a personal reference. As for romaji, the romanisation system used primarily in this thread is modern Hepburn (the type generally used across Japan today). However, in deference to Kintamayama-san, where the traditional Hepburn romanisation of the shikona differs from the modern Hepburn (e.g. when it contains a long vowel), the traditional Hepburn romanisation will follow after the modern Hepburn, separated by a slash, and substituting full spellings for macrons (because they're a pain in the ass to type on the forum). General notes on translation: The translation of the shikona is to a certain extent divorced from the meaning of the shikona to the individual rikishi. An example would be Asashoryu's given name portion of his shikona, Akinori, which can be translated as Brilliant Virtue, but its connection to Asashoryu himself stems more from the same kanji being the name of his high school, Meitoku (an alternate reading of Akinori) Gijuku High School. With a lot of shikona having connections either to the rikishi's heya and/or the rikishi's hometown, the closest Western equivalent I can think of would be the process by which Lenin's nom de guerre was inspired by the river Lena, with much more abstract connotations, rather than directly meaning anything in and of itself. It doesn't help that translating Chinese/Japanese to English is confounded with several issues, a little like with hieroglyphs: Kanji can be used both for their sound value and their meaning value. These two don't necessarily coincide. For instance, Baruto's shikona consists of kanji that are almost certainly entirely used for their sound value, whereas the kanji in shikona like Futeno are used primarily for its meaning value. Very few shikona are aptronyms in both meaning and sound, and this tends to be more for foreign rikishi like Sentoryu and Osunaarashi. In a particularly devilish twist of Japanese, kanji can actually be explicitly assigned a non-standard sound value essentially for stylistic purposes. The shikona Hayateumi is an example: standard pronunciation would have it pronounced something like Oiteumi (as it shares characters with Oitekaze stable), but it's instead pronounced as the word for "hurricane/gale" in Japanese, which has a different set of kanji altogether. More famously, Hokutoumi also changed the standard pronunciation of the kanji for "win" (usually "sho"/"katsu") to "to" as a means of including the name of his hometown in totality (the first half as sound, the second half as kanji). In a more codified form, some kanji when paired together may also take standardised but non-obvious meanings that are metaphorical or allusions: the -asuka portion of Tamaasuka is an example. The -asuka portion is written with characters that mean "flying bird" and could be pronounced "hitori", but the kanji are codified as being pronounced as "asuka" in a practice dating from the eponymous Asuka period in Japanese history. So the translations are for the most part fan-generated trivia in and of themselves - interesting pieces of information given some relevance only because we are mostly external to the Japanese context in which they occur and hence have another cultural base to refer to. I know there have been a couple of shikona-oriented threads in the past in this subforum, but having glanced through them quickly I think we are very justified in saying that this list of 300 or so (including older rikishi) is the most extensive yet. Also, if there are any sekitori shikona that you would like a translation for but which isn't in the list, do drop a reply and I'll try to get to it. No promises as to when, though. (Toriteki shikona are preferably avoided because a lot more actual Japanese family names tend to be in there, which makes it a lot less meaningful.) Contents: Shikona A-C Shikona D-H Shikona I-K Shikona M-S Shikona T-Z Asojima's Kanji/Shikona Notes Changelog: 10 Aug 2021: Created. 11 December 2021: Introduced new format with explainer on annotations and traditional Hepburn romanisation. 14 December 2021: Asojima's archive uploaded
  12. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    1. Ōnoshō 2. Tobizaru
  13. Seiyashi

    Guess Ura's Aite - May 2024 edition

    No concrete news on Asanoyama and Terunofuji yet, right?
  14. Am I the only one who finds the prospect of Ōnosato being kicked out darkly funny?
  15. Since we're getting meta about what Mt Rushmore means, my heretical take: rikishi who, for better or worse, put ōzumo on the course it is today. My nominees: Nishinoumi I - insisted on yokozuna being inscribed as an official rank, changing the structure of the banzuke as we know it. Asahikuni - first to recruit Mongolians en masse and paving the way for the current tension present in sumo about the recruitment of foreigners. Futahaguro - arguably most responsible for the tightening of the requirements for yokozuna. How much impact this had is debatable, but I'd bet Takakeishō would be yokozuna by now if not for the tightened promotion requirements. Chiyotaikai - main prolific abuser of the kōshō system. Would we have less of an injury problem in the upper ranks without him - would Shōdai, Mitakeumi and Takayasu still be ōzeki, at least?
  16. Seiyashi

    Sekitori Sweepstake - May 2024

    In please!
  17. Seiyashi

    Haru jungyo 2024

    He's just marking time until he can end his career with that 10th yūshō and see another yokozuna born.
  18. Maybe if the Kyokai had manufactured something, or closed the door on his future as a stablemaster I could see him rage quitting. But Hokuseiho was being a terror. And the Kyokai sending him to learn from a successful oyakata. It's basically them giving him a second chance. Maybe he'll bail if it looks like the Kyokai doesn't mean it, and tries to relegate him to supportingoyakata roles? I think it makes sense if you come at it from this angle: the NSK knows that Hakuhō's their golden goose in terms of individual brand power (e.g. look at that spanking brand new yūshō parade car), but it's also precisely because of the commitments from this brand power (events, talkshows, meeting sponsors etc) that caused his lack of supervision. And Hakuhō himself also knows it that he's caught dead to rights here, because Hokuseihō's bullying was some of the longest and worst that we've heard of for a while. The NSK doesn't want to kill the golden goose but they also can't let it slide for two reasons - one of public image (they can't be seen to be doing nothing) and another of making sure Hakuhō knows they can do something to him - so this. It really is the least worst option for both parties, all things considered, and Hakuhō got off relatively lightly.
  19. Seiyashi

    Kanjin ozumo for Noto-hanto relief

    Fundraising and charity, I believe. Kanjin sumo events were a way for temples and shrines in the old days to earn some money, as opposed to other basho put on purely for entertainment and full profit motive. My memory might be hazy but that's why a lot of shrines and temples had a dohyo. If I remember correctly, some kanjin sumo became a convenient fig leaf for actual entertainment basho that got out of hand, so the shogun had to specifically authorise events to be held - an early form of licence. That's why basho to this day have the gomen fuda, as a relic of that age.
  20. Seiyashi

    Haru 2024 Promotion/Demotion and Yusho Talk

    No, it was the Miyagino scandal, nothing personal. Couldn't believe it was happening.
  21. Seiyashi

    Haru 2024 Promotion/Demotion and Yusho Talk

    Omedetō shin-yokozuna Thanks for holding the fort also while I was out with an unexpected grief-stricken kyūjō.
  22. Seiyashi

    Haru 2024 discussion (results)

    I hope it's only in view of recent events and not permanently, so he should be back next basho. After all, he's still allocated to the press club, so it feels like he should be handling PR-adjacent matters moving forward. Although I'm not sure Shibatayama is exactly the best mentor... EDIT: I clearly hadn't read the changes in which Sadogatake was appointed as PR head now.
  23. Having had some time to come to terms with it, I agree moving in with Isegahama is the best option once having an independent Miyagino wasn't temporarily acceptable. And the training should be something special as well. Even if Terunofuji doesn't deign to coach the Miyagino rikishi, having Takerufuji around and a bunch of rikishi with sekitori experience surely has to count for something. If this results in a large jump up the banzuke for all the Miyagino boys, I won't be complaining.
  24. I cannot believe this is happening.