Seiyashi

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Everything posted by Seiyashi

  1. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    god no. Just. Not. Another. Yusho. on someone who does sod all with it. He's the greatest waste of yusho in the past few years. Thankfully he's almost mathematically out of it. The entire 7 man leaderboard would have to undergo a collective meltdown to hand him the yusho. I don't know what it says that we're into day 12 and it's theoretically still anyone's game. By now the intrasanyaku matches should be cutting down the arasoi really quick.
  2. Seiyashi

    Keiko mawashi stolen!!

    Maybe he's doing it in tribute to his rabbit. Sounds like a regular magic feather moment, though.
  3. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I think the greater concern is that something else breaks as a result of compensating for his knees. Once that happens, the load across everything else just goes up and it's a slippery slope from there.
  4. Seiyashi

    Aki talkie

    I have got to wonder what diddley squat translates to/from in Japanese. Yes, Mitakeumi, if only you did, you'd have been ozeki by now, if not yokozuna. Oddly enough this might be more honest than most. Arguably, thinking way too ahead got Asanoyama into a pickle at the start of this basho. Well, that is the template that ALL guys that go kyujo the next day use, so let's see what happens tomorrow.. I call bull on it being an everyday occurrence. But that said props really has to go to Takakeisho. If it really is everyday, the fella basically is fighting his own body - maybe not to the same extent as Masunoyama, but still - to get up on the dohyo, still make ozeki, and bag a yusho on the way. But if it's not every day, as someone pointed out in the main thread, he'd better not rupture another muscle trying to stay in the race. At least Chiganoura seems to have his head screwed on more firmly than Tagonoura when it comes to dealing with injuries.
  5. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    It's a great story but I always have a nagging feeling that his knees will deteriorate again and he'll start to fall back again. Hopefully I'm wrong and the surgery actually fixed the problem. You can't deteriorate what you don't have. (Ungrammatical, I know, but well.) I believe last basho he gave an interview when he talked about the state of his health; he's missing a fair few parts in them that most normal people should have.
  6. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I believe you mean Shimanoumi...
  7. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Yeah. Hopefully we don't see another career prematurely blighted irreparably by one.
  8. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    It looks more like he overexerted his right arm, since he couldn't put any weight on it for a bit.
  9. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Hopefully Takakeisho is alright. He seemed to have injured his right side. A super commanding performance for Asanoyama. Simultaneously, both ozeki dumped out the komusubi, meaning Terunofuji and Takanosho are in the sanyaku at least next basho.
  10. Seiyashi

    Rikishi Status - 2020 Aki Basho

    I can't help but read a (possibly unintended) swipe at Kotoshogiku in Michinoku oyakata's words.
  11. Seiyashi

    Promotion/Demotion/Yusho Discussion Aki 2020

    Which, of course, Asanoyama will do his best to spoil on senshuraku for the sake of his own, fading, hopes at one.
  12. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    It's two months a bit early, but I tip Enho to beat Hakuho in a playoff in November. Hakuho, crying with happiness at the success of his deshi, retires on the spot.
  13. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    And all this time, I thought Terutsuyoshi's relatives own a salt mine. On the opposite side, Ura throws a pinch. Back when jungyo were still a thing, Hakuho would indulge in monster salt throws on occasion as well. If one does it to excite fans, I see nothing wrong with it; except maybe where more than one person decides to do it and waste salt. On the flip side, there's also cases where people have thrown too much salt and slipped on the resulting pile. The closest that's happened in recent memory was Shodai v Myogiryu this tournament.
  14. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I'm out of reactions, but that is a very interesting and pertinent stat. My reference to Asanoyama's potential win-loss records was indeed meant to highlight the fact that neither the junyusho 12-3 finish nor a possible 12-3 yusho finish this month is Yokozuna-promotion worthy. The only argument for promotion would be two yushos (or equivalent) in a row, but the number of wins is probably more important. Beyond that, the record at ozeki matters as much. Copypasting a discussion I took part in that went off-topic in the Rikishi Status thread (originally regarding the fusen impact on a tsuna run), but now more pertinent for the record of pre-promotion yokozunas: If - and this is at the moment a humongous if - he pulls out the yusho, he can force the issue by yushoing in November. I would expect there to be grumbling about the quality of this yusho then, but I don't think anyone will want to be a major bitch about Asanoyama getting the rope as a retirement present for Takasago. Same goes if Asanoyama pulls a good 13+ jun-yusho or doten in November. I can buy there having been equal or worse 2 tournament promotion records in the past (notably Asashio and Onokuni), but the picture drastically changes once you consider the three-tournament record, because both of those men yushoed once, then turned in two junyushos before being promoted. And even amongst other headscratchers to this rule, like Wakanohana (I) and Kashiwado, they won yushos as ozeki and multiple jun-yushos, and maintained reasonable records prior to their promotion. The true headscratcher is probably Kisenosato, who never yushoed before, and whose 12-3J 14-1Y two tournament record was looked at askance by some commentators (source: Herouth (twitter @Sumofollower)), but he served as ozeki long enough with enough junyushos to make it a reasonable bet. And by any account, his shin-yokozuna tournament was a rousing success that only got buggered by injury. None of these apply to Asanoyama, whose previous yusho was a relatively weak hiramaku 12-3 and whose best score to date is 12 wins, and who has no long record of consistent performance at ozeki level. I can see why Isegahama was pretty categorical about him not starting a tsuna run, and I don't see what has changed in this 1 basho - even with a whole stable being knocked out - that drastically changes that picture as far as the NSK is concerned. Futahaguro is still recent enough that it'd be within the memory of many of the present riji, and I don't think any of them are in a hurry to follow that example.
  15. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I think it can only be a healthy thing for the sport (and the rikishi themselves), to bring height/weight parameters back to normalish. Bulking yourself up to add fat purely as ballast is mildly concerning, to say the least.
  16. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I'm no sportsman, but it seems to me like there's a significant group of sports stars who, because of their prodigious physical talent, "make" it relatively young, but then promptly proceed to make a bunch of bad decisions that casts aspersions on their reputation within the sport because they let the fame and money get to their head. Then there's others who survive that long enough to become the elder statesmen of their sports. Examples are legion mainly within soccer and the American sports scene, but examples of the former within sumo would seem to include Takanohana II and Asashoryu. Hakuho survived long enough to make the second category, even though he gets flak now and then, and Kakuryu had the advantage of sufficient maturity to never be in danger in the first place. In a sense, going to college and then using the tsukedashi system bodes better for the dignity that future yokozuna are expected to uphold. There're studies that suggest human brains don't mature until the wrong side of 20, so maybe a later promotion brings more hinkaku than earlier. But that also means less time to set Hakuho-like streaks, so he really might be the eternal record holder - he's spent more than half his life doing sumo! So maybe it's good for Asanoyama in that he doesn't have to deal with youth baggage, and as much as he feels he is on the clock, time really is on his side. Once he makes it, hopefully within the year, I give him 2-3 yusho's worth of time before the others get their act together. The big question is who is the next yokozuna after Asanoyama. I think it's a tossup between Takakeisho and Shodai, but I also have a feeling it might be neither of them, or any of the faces in makuuchi that've been around for a while.
  17. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I agree re the harite, kachiage, and henka. So it's interesting that you picked Kisenosato and Kakuryu as the two yokozuna to bracket Asanoyama's future wins based on skill vs rivals. Based on yusho record alone, Kakuryu appears to be the superior yokozuna, but the head to head amongst the four yokozunas says Kakuryu actually lost to Kisenosato most of the time. Yet Kisenosato was promoted later than Kakuryu, and even without his injury, probably would have at best matched Kakuryu for yusho count. I'd say it's a bit of a misfired analogy to say Kakuryu matched up to his rivals, because if you compare their career trajectories, it's worth noting that Kakuryu's and Asanoyama's paths are very different. Kakuryu entered sumo 6 years younger than Asanoyama, and 27 basho in, Kakuryu was still fighting in makushita. But both of them were the same age when they got to ozeki - 26. Kakuryu took 3 further years to be promoted, and we're all hoping Asanoyama does it faster. The thing is, Kakuryu had a very long time to refine his fighting style. It might be that as a fighter, he's a slower study than Asanoyama - he is the slowest of all foreign-born wrestlers to reach ozeki and yokozuna, and he doesn't have super impressive records against the stalwarts of his generation. Asanoyama doesn't have as long, but his capacity for learning proves to be a lot sharper - his sumo has improved a lot since last year, and I'd say it's reasonably on course to beat out his rivals pretty quickly. But, it's not the quality of the sumo against your rivals that necessarily counts unless you're looking for a zensho. It's the head game that's more important, and that's where I think we sort of both missed the wood for the trees while talking about technical skill. Kakuryu's head game is good because he didn't have much expectation placed on him and he has had a very long time to mature, despite not being hyperprodigious. Kisenosato in contrast screwed up repeatedly because of that. Right now, his performance this basho doesn't bode well for Asanoyama's head game, but that may change if his mentality matures as fast as his sumo. Now that we talk about it, one reason Asanoyama only gets past major milestones when important people to him die is maybe because he wants to live up to their expectations too much. So maybe we should expect an Asanoyama rope in Haru 2021 - two basho after Takasago retires!
  18. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Yeah, all bets are off in that scenario. But then again, any hiramaku yusho always makes the sanyaku look really bad, since the title expectations are overwhelmingly on them. I don't think the three hiramaku leaders will survive without any more losses, which makes Shodai v Takakeisho the likely decider, and it's not out of the question that it may be Terunofuji (considering the help from Takarafuji and, to a lesser extent, Terutsuyoshi in thinning the field) that Shodai eventually loses to in a playoff for a 12-3D. I think if he loses to Terunofuji, it's still ok, but if as you say it's a hiramaku yusho from one of the current maegashira leaders then no one's getting promoted this time. And of course, it has got to be Wacky Aki that this is all still so up in the air on day 10!
  19. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    I concur - the NSK is perhaps a little less conservative than many people give it credit for, and I think they'll be happy for a good excuse to promote Shodai as well. The problem is trying to divine what is a sufficiently good excuse for them, or rather, what is a sufficiently good excuse to keep the purists quiet - Asanoyama's good bout with Kakuryu sealed it, I think. As a result, if Shodai can beat Asanoyama and Takakeisho well, he's guaranteed a promotion, whether or not he yushos. The NSK will have enough ammo to say - look, this guy's got consecutive KK and can beat the two ozeki, and he puts up the numbers. I think he can even afford to drop one more hiramaku bout and still be promoted by beating those two, since promotion never requires invincibility, but if he loses to either or both of those two all bets are off. In recent memory, Takakeisho had a good by-the-numbers record going into his promotion, but a bad loss to Goeido delayed things by one basho for him; the reverse might happen for Shodai.
  20. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Which makes Shodai's worse from their perspective, so something just "by the numbers" won't suffice.
  21. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    As juryo, do I get fast-track promotion to Makuuchi with a daily leaderboard yusho?
  22. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Asanoyama made it really open and shut with 4 consecutive double-digit performances starting from the joi though. Purists will be wont to niggle at Shodai's 8-7. Also, there's been a surprisingly little amount of chatter about ozeki promotion this basho - perhaps overshadowed by Asanoyama and Terunofuji, I don't know - but maybe the reason no one is saying anything is because it's not by the numbers but by the quality (e.g. Asanoyama's bout with Kakuryu). The key points to watch might not just be the yusho, but the manner in which Shodai claims it. If he absolutely thrashes Asanoyama and Takakeisho en route, I'd say he's a shoo in, yusho or no yusho.
  23. Seiyashi

    Promotion/Demotion/Yusho Discussion Aki 2020

    If - and this is at the moment a humongous if - he pulls out the yusho, he can force the issue by yushoing in November. I would expect there to be grumbling about the quality of this yusho then, but I don't think anyone will want to be a major bitch about Asanoyama getting the rope as a retirement present for Takasago. Same goes if Asanoyama pulls a good 13+ jun-yusho or doten in November. I can buy there having been equal or worse 2 tournament promotion records in the past (notably Asashio and Onokuni), but the picture drastically changes once you consider the three-tournament record, because both of those men yushoed once, then turned in two junyushos before being promoted. And even amongst other headscratchers to this rule, like Wakanohana (I) and Kashiwado, they won yushos as ozeki and multiple jun-yushos, and maintained reasonable records prior to their promotion. The true headscratcher is probably Kisenosato, who never yushoed before, and whose 12-3J 14-1Y two tournament record was looked at askance by some commentators (source: Herouth (twitter @Sumofollower)), but he served as ozeki long enough with enough junyushos to make it a reasonable bet. And by any account, his shin-yokozuna tournament was a rousing success that only got buggered by injury. None of these apply to Asanoyama, whose previous yusho was a relatively weak hiramaku 12-3 and whose best score to date is 12 wins, and who has no long record of consistent performance at ozeki level. I can see why Isegahama was pretty categorical about him not starting a tsuna run, and I don't see what has changed in this 1 basho - even with a whole stable being knocked out - that drastically changes that picture as far as the NSK is concerned. Futahaguro is still recent enough that it'd be within the memory of many of the present riji, and I don't think any of them are in a hurry to follow that example. Er, in any case, not sure whether this discussion should be excised from this thread and merged with Sakura's promotion/demotion thread. It seems to have gone from the original discussion of how the fusen affects Asanoyama's chances at the rope.
  24. Seiyashi

    September (Aki) Basho- offical thread (yay..)

    Not in Kokonoe stable you won't. Get to yokozuna first, and then maybe you'll be allowed to get married....