Eikokurai

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Posts posted by Eikokurai


  1. Hey guys. I doubt you noticed or cared, but I’ve not been around so far this basho. I’ve been watching the vids on YT, but been crazy busy at work this past week and had some stuff going on in my personal life too, so not really had the mood for sumo. Anyway, deadlines have now passed and things are a bit quieter today, so I’m slacking off and finally watching sumo live. I don’t have much else to say right now, just wanted to say hi. Kind of hoping Oho can defy his usual form and stay strong in week 2 to stay in the yusho race though. Would be good to see him and Hoshoryu in a face-off for the trophy, a sort of Sumo Pedigree Playoff.

    • Like 10

  2. 1 hour ago, Eikokurai said:

    Thinking about how Takayasu missed out on a yusho again, I was struck by just how close he came to Yokozuna in 2018. He finished that year with five kachikoshi, missing only one basho to due to injury. Among those KK’s, he had back-to-back 12-3JYs. That’s agonizingly close. 12-3 has been good enough to win three of the five basho this year (March, May and July). Terunofuji has won four of his seven championships with 12-3 records. If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope. Sumo can be cruel that way. One or two losses can affect the whole course of a career.

    What are some other good examples of this? i.e. a rikishi coming within 1-2 wins of a career-changing event but it going the other way? Terunofuji comes to mind. In March 2017 he lost twice to Kisenosato on senshuraku. A win in regulation would have given Teru a 14-1 yusho. A win in the playoff would have been a 13-2Y. He followed that basho with a 12-3JY. One more win in March and one more in in May and he’d have made Yokozuna four years earlier and he’d likely be retired already from injury.


  3. Thinking about how Takayasu missed out on a yusho again, I was struck by just how close he came to Yokozuna in 2018. He finished that year with five kachikoshi, missing only one basho to due to injury. Among those KK’s, he had back-to-back 12-3JYs. That’s agonizingly close. 12-3 has been good enough to win three of the five basho this year (March, May and July). Terunofuji has won four of his seven championships with 12-3 records. If Takayasu could transfer Jan and March 2018 to Jan and March 2022, I think he’d get at least one championship and probably the rope. Sumo can be cruel that way. One or two losses can affect the whole course of a career.

    • Like 2

  4. Wakatakakage ends on 11-4 to restart an Ozeki run. His brother is in the next bout. When is the last time two brothers fought back to back in Makuuchi? (Probably last basho and I didn’t notice …)

    And just to complicate the query, when is the last time two brothers WON back to back?


  5. It hasn’t had much attention, but Ryuden has returned from suspension with vengeance. After a Makushita yusho and then two in Juryo, he’s got himself a possible JY on his return to the top division, winning 10 bouts in succession. 

    • Like 2

  6. Oho really has a kachikoshi allergy, eh? In his Makuuchi debut he was on 7 wins for the last five days and missed every opportunity to get an 8th. An almost mirror basho to this one. Last time around he scraped 8 wins only thanks to a fusen and didn’t get the KK at the first opportunity.


  7. 4 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

    Takayasu needs the win to force a playoff by beating Tamawashi tomorrow (assuming that definitely gets scheduled).

    Yusho race aside, Ryuden has quietly racked up 10 wins and Wakatakakage had a superb turnaround to recover from 0-3 to be on 10-4 today.

    And he gets it. Final day drama then. Takayasu can force a playoff by not choking tomorrow.


  8. Takayasu needs the win to force a playoff by beating Tamawashi tomorrow (assuming that definitely gets scheduled).

    Yusho race aside, Ryuden has quietly racked up 10 wins and Wakatakakage had a superb turnaround to recover from 0-3 to be on 10-4 today.


  9. 24 minutes ago, Hankegami said:

    If I had my data are correct, Tamawashi would be the oldest yusho winner ever were to win this basho. He is about 37 years 10 months old right now, an age greater than current record older Koyokutenho who won the Natsu 2012 basho at 37 years 8 months. I don't have data for late-thirties winners unfortunately, but considering that relatively few rikishi actually won the cup, and even fewer fought up to their mid-thirties, I am positive that Tamawashi would likely be a first. Most wrestlers are already retired at 37 years old usually after a prolonged slump beginning once gone past 30, forget winning both their Maakuchi yusho well into their thirties.

    EDIT: Also, your typical mid-thirties yusho winner is usually a veteran Yokozuna. Hakuho won his last cup at 36 but won his first at 21. Chiyonofuji had his last at 35 but his first at 25. Haguroyama, the original Ironman - retired at almost 39 - won his last at 37 (and 4 months, iirc) but his first at 26. The list could go on. Perhaps some surprises could come from 18th-19th century tournaments when rikishi were more prone to fight well into their 40s, but it would be artificial since there was no Cup before 1909.

    All the more remarkable when we consider that he’s never missed a bout (Covid-mandated kyujo excepted). He’s never given himself a day off to rest, so to still be competing at this level is really something.


  10. Usually the best fix for a cocky young man with too much unearned swagger is to meet his match and be humbled. Otani will hit a wall at some point and be made to look stupid by rikishi much better than him. It’s east to strut about like you’re the alpha when you’re dusting up lanky teenagers down in Jonokuchi; we’ll see how he reacts to being on the receiving end.


  11. 16 minutes ago, Suwihuto said:

    That would certainly be fun, but I'd be amazed if Tamawashi didn't get at least one more win. It would be harder to lose from here, especially with the limited opposition.

    Even if he wins only one, tomorrow, we may still get a playoff if Takayasu also wins tomorrow and then beats Tamawashi in the H2H on Sunday. They’d both end 12-3 then. Hokutofuji can also win twice to end 12-3 for a three-way playoff. We always get denied those, but the schedulers can’t work it to avoid the possibility this time. Hokutofuji has already faced Tamawashi and Takayasu. It’s in his hands to force the playoff if Tamawashi slips up once. Plenty of what ifs to keep an eye on!

    • Like 1

  12. 1 hour ago, Seiyashi said:

    Think you're off by a loss in those numbers except the 9-4.

    Right, end 11-4, I mean, not 11-3. If Tamawashi (now 11-2) and Takayasu (now 10-3) both lose tomorrow and then Takayasu wins their expected H2H on Sunday, they’ll both end on 11-4 which could lead to at least a playoff between them, possibly joined by Hokutofuji depending on his results, and/or any of the 9-4s who win their final two bouts.  There are quite a lot of possible permutations to the weekend finale.


  13. 1 hour ago, Kaninoyama said:

    That was an Ozeki-Takayasu tachiai from Takayasu. Yusho race down to three. 

    Strictly speaking, all the 9-4 guys are still in with a shot at a playoff until the inevitable Tamawashi-Takayasu bout is announced for day 15. That’s the only remaining match-up that hasn’t happened between the top three. It’ll happen, no doubt, but on paper at least the trailers are still mathematically in it. Even then they could still be in it if Tamawashi and Takayasu both go into senshuraku with the same records as today (11-2 and 10-3) and then Takayasu wins to end 11-3 and take it to a playoff, which some of the 9-4 guys could join if they win out til Sunday. 

    • Like 1

  14. Despite the generally low quality basho, we at least have the prospect of an exciting finale with three guys in the race (and technically all the 9-win guys are still in until one of those reaches 12). Tamawashi’s to lose, and his experience will probably carry him over the line, but Hokutofuji will be keen to capitalize on the best chance he’s ever had to take a yusho, while Takayasu can almost smell the missed opportunity.