Eikokurai

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Everything posted by Eikokurai

  1. Eikokurai

    Futagoyama-beya coming back

    Yeah, come to think of it I’ve seen loads of pictures of rikishi in casual clothes kicking about in the heya. Not sure why that photo above struck me the way it did. I think because I’d just read John Gunning’s piece on the42.com in which he describes the challenging life behind the scenes.
  2. Eikokurai

    Futagoyama-beya coming back

    Looks like a pretty relaxed heya with the toriteki in casual western-style clothes eating pizza. Or are more heya actually like this behind closed doors than we're led to believe?
  3. Eikokurai

    Takanohana Ichimon-the end?

    Okay, thanks. I will gambarize.
  4. Eikokurai

    Takanohana Ichimon-the end?

    Doesn’t seem to have worked. Perhaps it’s just the internet here in China messing about. I couldn’t even create an account for the longest time.
  5. Eikokurai

    Takanohana Ichimon-the end?

    I just have “quote”. I think maybe I have to earn editing privileges like a young toriteki has to earn the right to wear a winter coat.
  6. Eikokurai

    Takanohana Ichimon-the end?

    Can it also be considered a ‘kaimei’ and written as ‘Takanohana ichimon aratame Onomatsu ichimon’ like when a rikishi changes his shikona? (Sorry for the double post but I’ve no idea how to edit.)
  7. Eikokurai

    Takanohana Ichimon-the end?

    When a heya or ichimon changes its name do we use the ‘moto’ prefix as with rikishi? i.e. Can we refer to moto-Takanohana ichimon?
  8. Eikokurai

    Persistence Watch - 2018 edition

    Just for extra info, a win in such a bout is called a kachidoku and a loss is a makedoku. :)
  9. Eikokurai

    Pre-match/bout routines of certain sumo wrestlers

    Interesting. I’ve noticed that I always yawn involuntarily when I’m nervous. Perhaps that’s my body acting on instinct to try and put me at ease.
  10. Eikokurai

    Should-have-been Y/O

    I think where we’re having trouble is that you have in mind “career-threatening injuries” whereas I was really just thinking about the sort of manageable decline common to all athletes as a result of age and general wear and tear. Kotoshōgiku is an example of what I mean. He’s past his peak but ploughs on regardless as a Maegashira, perhaps with the occasional return to junior sanyaku. Had he somehow made Yokozuna after that yusho in 2016 he’d have properly gone intai already. At 34 and after 16 years on the dohyo his body isn’t able to perform at Yokozuna/Ozeki levels but he can still compete, can still get paid. Why not carry on if that’s what you want to do and loss of rank doesn’t bother you? At the end of the day, for a lot of rikishi sumo is just a job. It’s easy to get caught up in the aura of it all, but before it’s a cultural event sumo is a sport and the guys doing it are athletes earning their crust.
  11. Eikokurai

    Funny videos and photos of rikishi at play

    Has the dohyo been made out of matcha powder?
  12. Eikokurai

    Should-have-been Y/O

    Thanks for the contribution.
  13. Eikokurai

    Should-have-been Y/O

    You and I are not having the same conversation. My point is simply that a Yokozuna doesn’t have the option of getting demoted to prolong a career. If they underperform, they will be expected to retire eventually. They may be given leeway to get healthy/rediscover their form, but it isn’t forever. Kakuryu was about one basho from a press conference last year. Terunofuji never was. He just accepted demotion and carried on. If you love your sumo career, it may be better to never take the rope as it’s your choice alone when to call it a day. The JSA has never pressured an aging Maegashira to hang up his mawashi.
  14. Eikokurai

    Should-have-been Y/O

    See Kisenosato as an example. He’s being allowed to sit out for now but it won’t last indefinitely. If he can’t return at good strength, he will come under pressure to retire. As an ozeki he could just slide down the rankings and nobody would mind. Yokozuna don’t get that luxury: for them it’s all or nothing. They can’t voluntarily get demoted.
  15. Eikokurai

    Should-have-been Y/O

    Kaiō is one of my favourites. His and Chiyotaikai’s era at Ozeki was when I was first getting into sumo properly. I loved them both, but nothing is clear about Kaiō’s situation. Indeed, his case is pretty much the perfect example of borderline. Had he been promoted I would have said, “Sure, I get it. His numbers are good and his sumo is strong. He has the yushos to show it.” But, equally, him not getting promoted elicits a “Sure, I get it. He was often kyujo, wasn’t consistent, some of his JYs were well off-pace and he never really put the JSA in the situation where they could avoid the question.” His career record is completely open to interpretation: strong in places, weak in plenty of others. We can’t say that he “clearly” deserved the promotion at all.
  16. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    Australian’s use ‘football’ for a number of codes: rugby league, rugby union, Aussie rules and actually football. It’s quite confusing.
  17. Eikokurai

    Haru jungyo 2018

    Shoudai has the face of a ten year old being scolded for forgetting his homework.
  18. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    Man comes on internet to argue. Says he doesn’t want to argue. Classic.
  19. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    You can’t count me among those people and nothing I’ve said so far could have given you that impression.
  20. Eikokurai

    Ex-Jūryō Oyakata

    Not really, but an Oyakata can only be credited so much with that anyway. There are of course subtle differences in how they coach – e.g. a oshi- specialist vs a yotsu-specialist would favour certain kimarite to practice – but a lot of the techniques used are the same across all heya. Everyone is doing butsukari and shiko, for example. Raising a talented rikishi relies a lot on finding a talented recruit to begin with.
  21. Eikokurai

    Ex-Jūryō Oyakata

    In one of those random thoughts I often have when I’m sitting on the toilet with nothing better to do, I wondered what is the lowest career-high rank ever reached by a rikishi who went on to become an Ōyakata? The current lowest is ex-Dairyū who only made it as far as Jūryō 4 and now heads up Ōtake-beya. Everyone else is ex-Makuuchi with of course most ex-Sanyaku as well.
  22. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    Why are you here then? Looking at your posting history this thread is the first you’ve commented on in over a year and there was a three-year gap before that. I’m curious why you’ve returned now to rant about religion and misogyny. I think you ought to wait for the Guardian opinion piece and share your thoughts there instead of trying to bait fans of sumo here. Your virtue signaling will find a much wider audience on an international newspaper than this obscure forum for a niche sport frequented by a handful of nerds.
  23. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    A very good point. That momentum I speak of might come if more Japanese women are in public office and as a result the JSA is more frequently put in awkward situations where it has to tell female politicians that they can’t go on the dohyo.
  24. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    Change requires momentum. I’m not sure example from several decades of just sumo’s modern history is enough to produce much of a need.
  25. Eikokurai

    Women mount dohyo during emergency at jungyo

    Indeed, and that’s why nobody has ever thought about it. The need for change hasn’t really been there.