sumofan

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About sumofan

  • Rank
    Maegashira
  • Birthday 28/11/1976

Profile Information

  • Location
    Belgium

Affiliations

  • Heya Affiliation
    Azumazeki-beya
  • Favourite Rikishi
    Takamisakari

Recent Profile Visitors

1,032 profile views
  1. Hey Fujisan I tried sending you a message but got a message you cannot receive messages.

    1. Fujisan

      Fujisan

      Hi Sumofan

      Thanks for informing me I will look into that.....

      Meanwhile,you can post messages to me here.....

      Sorry for the problems sending messages.....

      Fujisan

    2. sumofan

      sumofan

      Hey Fujisan. Thx but it's something I'd rather send to you in private. I'll wait for you to check what the problem is.

  2. sumofan

    Robo's Last Stand

    The end of an era. To me, he was the spirit of sumo. Not because he was so good, but because he kept trying, fought hard and stayed real.
  3. sumofan

    Translation question

    We need a facepalm smiley... Because that should have been dead obvious.
  4. sumofan

    Translation question

    Hey guys, I have another question. Btw, if you get annoyed with my questions, just say so and I’ll stop pestering you. :) I understand the difference between te and tari, however, there is something still unclear to me. Or rather, 2 things. The first is this: With the list of stuff the old man does, the te form is used to indicate that the various things belong together: Collecting firewood to sell in the village to make a living. However, the sentence ends with 暮らしを 立て ていました. Why is the ‘te’ 2 times at the end there? And then the second thing: For the old woman, there is a list of things joined together with tari, which I interpret as just a list of independent things. However, at some point, tari and te are joined together. Would it be correct to conclude that the ‘shitarishite’ concludes the general listing of things, and then joins that list to the household work to mean that she did the household work AND a list of other things? お祖母さんは 畑を耕したり,お掃除したり、川で 洗濯したりして、留守番を していました
  5. sumofan

    Wearing a mawashi

    Wow! If only I knew how to put on a mawashi :)
  6. sumofan

    Translation question

    Thanks for your help, all. I am currently trying to translate page 2 of momotaro. As soon as I have that ready, I'll probably want to check if my translation matched the actual text. It's frustrating that 4 lines of text, meant for an audience of 5 year olds, can take so much time. Then again, Japanese people learning Dutch are not having an easy time either. :-)
  7. sumofan

    Translation question

    Hey guys, I have a follow up question. In the first part of the page, the story tells how the old man collects firewood (takagi wo tottekite) and kintamayama said it means something like 'goes and gathers firewood'. Would it be correct to say that even though kuru means 'to come', the Japanese sometimes use it in the same way that we would say 'go and do something'?
  8. sumofan

    Translation question

    Thanks. Now I see. The ki is from kuru, not kiru... You know, this is imo the hardest part about Japanese. Not the kanji or kana. That's just a matter of repetition. What really makes things difficult, is that there is no 1 to 1 relation between words and meaning. In English, Dutch or French, 1 word (1 collection of phonems) means 1 thing. In Japanese, 1 concept has multiple phonems attached to it (unyomi and kunyomi), and 1 phonem (such as to, or ki) can mean multiple concepts. So when you hear spoken Japanese, or read hiragana, it is a big challenge to figure out not only the grammar, but what the phonems probably mean in that particular context.
  9. Hey guys, I've been studying Japanese for some time now, and I have started translating a children's tale in an attempt to read it and get some feeling for the actual language patterns instead of just grammar and kanji. I can make sense of it, but something is puzzling me. The story is about momotaro (which you might know). Anyway, in the beginning some people are introduced, one of which is an old man who gathers firewood to make a living. it says '薪を取ってきてそれを売って暮らしを立てています' which translates to gather firewood to sell at the village to make a living' A Japanese person once wrote that translation for me, but at the moment I can't easily ask him for more explanation. The first thing I did was to figure out which kanji were used (it was written in hiragana) which I think I did correctly. But I have 2 questions 1) the part about gathering firewood uses tottekite which I've had trouble interpreting. The to part means 'to gather', so why is the 'ki' still needed? The only sensible thing I could come up with was that it stems from 'kiru' in which tottekite means 'cut and gather' rather than just cut. Is that correct? 2) if kurasu itself already means 'to make a living', why would the writer use ' kurashi o tate' instead of 'kurashite' I hope my questions are at least understandable. I know what confuses me, but I don't know if I was able to correctly explain it, with my limited grasp of Japanese grammar.
  10. sumofan

    Rikishi sez-Day 7

    I'm sure that if the kyokai agreed with you, it would be against the rules, or at least frowned upon. Given that the kyokai can complain about the most trivial matters, I'd say 'slapping and elbowing' is just fine. The world of sumo doesn't seem to worry about 'your' opinion of what is or is not suitable for sumo.
  11. sumofan

    Number of Heya Applications at record low :(

    I am definitely not looking down on Japan or Japanese people. If I were, I would not be learning Japanese, or learning traditional Japanese jujutsu. Different countries have different peculiarities. And the Japanese people I've interacted with were friendly, helpful, and knowledgeable in their own areas of expertise. It's just that whenever I see something that looks unworldly weird, it often turns out to be from Japan. Like this doritos bag Or this perfume with the scent of freshly washed young boys anus And for the kids: Moderator Notice Per request, further wierdness moved to the wierd thread.
  12. sumofan

    Number of Heya Applications at record low :(

    In all fairness, Japan does have a rather deserved reputation in that area.
  13. I agree with your sentiment, but I don't think that it really matters. HF's biggest sin is not being Japanese. There is a saying in my country: if you want to hit a dog, you'll always find a stick. Meaning that no matter what, they'll always find something to criticize him for. Given that they can't actually criticize him for not being of Japanese descent, they'll just criticize him for not being what they think a Japanese yokozuna should do or be like. The guy just won 2 consecutive zensho yusho. They can't really complain about his performance without looking silly. So they'll just criticize the way he does his sumo. And about what a yokozuna is 'supposed' to do... by what standard? The standard of some guy on an internet forum who has never stepped inside the dohyo? I'd say the yokozuna themselves set the standard. So let's look at the previous ones. If they want a different standard, then all they need is to train Japanese rikishi to become yokozuna and set that standard. They outnumber the foreigners already so that should be easy enough, no? While I do agree with the sentiment overall, Kitanoumi is hardly "some guy on an internet forum who has never stepped inside the dohyo". One of the few good things with the current sumo management structure is that, unlike most other sports, the oyakata know the mentality of the rikishi (even if some seem to have forgotten). My apologies about this confusion. With the 'internet guys' I meant some people here who talk like they own sumo and determine what is or is not proper for a yokozuna. Kitanoumi of course does not fall in that category :)
  14. I agree with your sentiment, but I don't think that it really matters. HF's biggest sin is not being Japanese. There is a saying in my country: if you want to hit a dog, you'll always find a stick. Meaning that no matter what, they'll always find something to criticize him for. Given that they can't actually criticize him for not being of Japanese descent, they'll just criticize him for not being what they think a Japanese yokozuna should do or be like. The guy just won 2 consecutive zensho yusho. They can't really complain about his performance without looking silly. So they'll just criticize the way he does his sumo. And about what a yokozuna is 'supposed' to do... by what standard? The standard of some guy on an internet forum who has never stepped inside the dohyo? I'd say the yokozuna themselves set the standard. So let's look at the previous ones. If they want a different standard, then all they need is to train Japanese rikishi to become yokozuna and set that standard. They outnumber the foreigners already so that should be easy enough, no?
  15. sumofan

    Should Hakuho Retire?

    A certain respect is expected of the fans as well. There are a number of no no's. If that isn't one, it should be. I did say 'if'. Honestly, I would never have the guts to say something like that in person. Those guys are more than a bit intimidating. Still, wouldn't the audience simply equate my comments with those of a gaijin barbarian? Yes. In all likelihood they would ignore you. I think. However, most people here would never do such a thing because it would be very bad manners, not because it might lead to an ass kicking.