Yubinhaad

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Everything posted by Yubinhaad

  1. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi Status Aki 2019 - Day 8 Late

    Press reporting Ichinojo as kyujo from Day 5 due to his shoulder injury. Tamawashi will get the freebie.
  2. Yubinhaad

    BG record

    As far as I know that is now the record, surpassing the 12-basho stint of Asaamami (now Asanoshima).
  3. Yubinhaad

    2019 Aki Basho Discussion (spoiler alert!)

    A rare treat in Sandanme, the first mitokorozeme for just over 8 years, courtesy of Kaishu.
  4. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi Status Aki 2019 - Day 8 Late

    NHK reporting Hakuho kyujo from Day 2!
  5. Yubinhaad

    Retirees after Aki 2019

    In July, Mugi was taken to a vet after his (was it a male cat? I don't actually know...) health deteriorated; a malignant tumour was found in his lung and adenocarcinoma was diagnosed. Sadly, he died on September 5th. Leaving the heya for the last time:
  6. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke Surfing Aki 2019 (13th Wave)

    Mk54w Tochikamiyama this time, please.
  7. 30-year-old Dewahayate has announced his retirement after a 15-year career. He joined Dewanoumi-beya in 2004, but his relatively small stature meant it took just over a decade for him to make his Juryo debut, in the 2014 Kyushu basho. In total he spent six basho in the division, with two kachi-koshi, but persistent neck problems saw him fall back to Makushita. Today he signed off with a win and kachi-koshi in his final bout against former Maegashira Tokushinho. "As a new recruit I was the weakest in the heya. I was happy to make it to Juryo," commented Dewahayate afterwards. In the future he plans to train for a career in acupuncture. Greeted with flowers by his stablemates in the hanamichi, following that final bout. And from an old jungyo, in his kesho-mawashi featuring Okazaemon, mascot from his home city Okazaki, Aichi prefecture. [Edited the title as Tochihiryu's intai has since been confirmed by the Kyokai] No official announcement yet but 32-year-old Tochihiryu also received flowers today, retiring after a 13-year career. He won two Jonidan yusho during the early part of his career, the second one beginning a post-injury return that saw him rise to Makushita. His Juryo debut came in the 2013 Haru basho, in which he finished 8-7, although that was to be his only kachi-koshi among nine total basho in the division. He too signed off today with a win and kachi-koshi, pulling down Oki. Tochihiryu's sumo was overwhelmingly oshi-based; I notice now that he had a mere 4 yorikiri wins during his career. With flowers outside the Kokugikan. He was joined in the sunshine by Dewahayate.
  8. Yubinhaad

    Former Juryo Dewahayate and Tochihiryu intai

    Some pictures from Dewahayate's danpatsu-shiki, which took place at the Kokugikan the other day.
  9. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke for Aki 2019

    The Kyokai website finally caught up with Takahiro's retirement. In addition, Isenoumi-beya's Jonidan yobidashi Masayuki has gone too, after eight years. Off topic: lately I'm having a lot of trouble with my ageing and increasingly cranky computer. I'm in the market for a replacement, but until I get one things I usually post like kimarite statistics may be delayed, sorry in advance for that.
  10. Yubinhaad

    Latest kabu-babu changes

    Former Maegashira Sadanofuji has switched from the Nakamura myoseki (owned by Yoshikaze) and is now borrowing the Yamashina myoseki, ostensibly still owned by ex-Onishiki since his mandatory retirement a year ago.
  11. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke for Aki 2019

    In fact the second kanji of his musashi is not so obvious after all - I didn't spot that it's a rare variant of the one used in Musashigawa-beya (武蔵川). It's only been used by a handful of rikishi before, one of whom was the 33rd Yokozuna Musashiyama. Shin-Sandanme Wakaryusei has been presented with a pair of setta by Nishiiwa-oyakata (former Sekiwake Wakanosato): In both these cases I'm wondering if it's a precursor to intai... I had the same thought although only about Daikiho. I read somewhere that he has been suffering from the same problem Masunoyama had a while ago, yellow ligament ossification. I've come to think of Hamaeiko as the heya manager type, especially since all the other rikishi in Onoe-beya are no older than 24. But at 34 he's obviously nearer the end of his career than the start, so you could well be right.
  12. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke for Aki 2019

    Eight more changes besides shin-Juryo Tamaki/Asagyokusei, which was announced along with his promotion. Three rikishi have gone back to their previous shikona after varying amounts of time. Fujita spent a year under his real name and now returns to Yamatoarashi. Veteran Ishida fought for a year and a half under his real name, now returning to Hamaeiko and changing his given name to Michinari. Meanwhile, former Maegashira Yamaguchi has finally returned to his old shikona of Daikiho after four and a half years. In Musashigawa-beya, Tokuda is now Tokunomusashi, a merger of family name, hometown and heya - Toku is from both his family name and hometown, the 'no' is from Tokunoshima, while musashi is obvious. Nishiiwa-beya seems to have taken on the old Kokonoe-beya tradition of bestowing a shikona upon promotion to Sandanme. The second rikishi from the heya to be thus rewarded is Wakanoguchi, who in fact makes an interesting change from Waka-family-name to Waka-given-name - he is now Wakaryusei, and adds the new given name of Kazuo. Over in Yamahibiki-beya, Yabugasaki is still called that, but makes a change to the middle character. Elsewhere, Asahiyama-beya's Hironaka is now Akinishiki - this Aki has made a number of appearances over the years with other Hiroshima natives. I'm only guessing, but maybe Hironaka was originally born in the town of Akitsu, which was merged into his shusshin of Higashihiroshima during an expansion of the city in 2005. Finally, Kokonoe-beya newcomer Hisasue is now Chiyotsurugi, a shikona seen once before towards the end of the Showa era. J14e Tamaki > Asagyokusei (朝玉勢) Mk48w Fujita > Yamatoarashi (大和嵐) Sd14e Tokuda > Tokunomusashi (徳之武藏) Sd56w Ishida Tetsuya > Hamaeiko Michinari (濱栄光 道也) Sd69e Wakanoguchi Ryusei > Wakaryusei Kazuo (若龍星 和雄) Sd89e Yamaguchi > Daikiho (大喜鵬) Jd38e Yabugasaki (藪ヶ崎 > 藪ケ崎) Jk14e Hironaka > Akinishiki (安芸錦) Jk33w Hisasue > Chiyotsurugi (千代剣)
  13. Hi all, here at last are the kimarite statistics for this basho, in which Yokozuna Kakuryu produced some of his best sumo for a while to claim his 6th Makuuchi yusho. Elsewhere, Takasago-beya continued their 2019 yusho winning streak, this basho it was Terasawa who clinched the Sandanme yusho in a kettei-sen against veteran stablemate Asatenmai. And Aminishiki finally reached the end of the road, retiring after another knee injury rather than lose his long-held place in the sekitori ranks. Moving on to the techniques, former Maegashira Sagatsukasa had a good win on Day 9 to secure his kachi-koshi - for a moment it looks like he's setting up to launch Wakatakamoto with an ipponzeoi shoulder throw, but then he changes tactic and trips his opponent's leg for a nice chongake win. I thought there might have been an earlier chongake this basho in the bout between Matsuda and Hokutoo, but it seems the leg grab was more instrumental to the win than the trip, so it was recorded as the only watashikomi of the basho instead. Speaking of Matsuda, he was on the losing end of one of the two ushiromotare here. It's only the 7th basho with two or more of those since it was introduced in the 2001 kimarite expansion, and the first since 2016 Hatsu. Unfortunately I didn't find videos of those bouts. Two former judoka put their skills to use in Nagoya and got their first wins of the basho as a result. Hironaka threw Hokutosato with the first ipponzeoi of the year (no video of that one either I'm afraid). Two days later, Ryuga toppled Chida with a slightly slow-motion nichonage. Kaishu will be back in Sandanme again on the next banzuke after a kachi-koshi here which included wins by kekaeshi and uchimuso. It was the first win of his career with either of those moves. There were four amiuchi wins in this basho, only the second time we've seen that many in basho with complete information for all divisions, along with 2014 Nagoya. It was the third amiuchi win already of Toki's career, it'll be interesting to see how many more he can add in the future. There were also four susoharai here, the most in a basho since 2017 Kyushu which saw five. The most notable of them came from yusho winner Kakuryu - it was the second susoharai win of his career, the first one coming 15 years ago! Lastly, I wouldn't usually mention the technique in the notes but I did enjoy this quick bout - former Juryo Keitenkai tries a flying henka and ends up throwing Fukuyama with a fine kotenage. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics (they're actually missing from the database for the moment, f.a.o @Doitsuyama). Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Amiuchi 1 0 0 0 1 2 4 0.16% Ashitori 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 0.12% Chongake 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 4 1 1 3 7 0 16 0.64% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 27 21 44 67 54 9 222 8.84% Hikiotoshi 16 5 11 31 25 6 94 3.74% Hikkake 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04% Isamiashi 0 0 1 0 3 0 4 0.16% Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kainahineri 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0.08% Kakenage 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 2 4 4 4 7 3 24 0.96% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 0 1 3 1 5 0 10 0.40% Kimetaoshi 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08% Kirikaeshi 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotenage 12 2 12 7 19 2 54 2.15% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubinage 0 0 1 4 1 0 6 0.24% Makiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuridashi 4 6 14 21 35 5 85 3.39% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurinage 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0.08% Okuritaoshi 0 1 6 6 3 3 19 0.76% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 64 47 109 163 179 57 619 24.65% Oshitaoshi 9 8 7 28 27 10 89 3.54% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Shitatedashinage 1 1 1 2 3 1 9 0.36% Shitatehineri 1 1 1 1 3 0 7 0.28% Shitatenage 2 5 9 15 16 4 51 2.03% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotogake 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0.12% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 3 2 10 14 15 8 52 2.07% Susoharai 1 1 0 0 2 0 4 0.16% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tottari 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 0.12% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 13 1 13 7 7 0 41 1.63% Tsukihiza 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 0.12% Tsukiotoshi 17 9 19 44 30 4 123 4.90% Tsukitaoshi 2 2 2 0 2 0 8 0.32% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 0 1 0 0 3 0 4 0.16% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 0.12% Uchimuso 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0.08% Utchari 0 0 3 3 2 3 11 0.44% Uwatedashinage 8 6 11 4 9 3 41 1.63% Uwatehineri 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.08% Uwatenage 9 11 15 23 43 5 106 4.22% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 79 62 97 159 179 58 634 25.25% Yoritaoshi 5 9 16 36 42 25 133 5.30% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
  14. Yubinhaad

    Retirees July 2019

    Hakkaku-beya held a short training camp on Okinoshima, Shimane prefecture following the Nagoya basho, and it was there that Okinoiwa's danpatsu-shiki was held. Rikishi from Isenoumi-beya joined them on the trip.
  15. Yubinhaad

    Games Talk Nagoya 2019

    Phew... with the corrected results I hang on to my precious Kanto-sho by my fingernails as the last kachi-koshi player, and the only one not to pick yusho winner Kakuryu. Amusingly, in the Natsu basho I was in the opposite position of first make-koshi player.
  16. Yubinhaad

    Aki jungyo 2019

    And here is that full schedule of events, including an Aki jungyo Aki event on the 22nd. Oct 5th - Nanao, Ishikawa Oct 6th - Kanazawa, Ishikawa Oct 7th - Tonami, Toyama Oct 8th - Itoigawa, Niigata Oct 9th - Otawara, Tochigi Oct 10th - Chiba, Chiba Oct 11th - Sagamihara, Kanagawa Oct 12th - Kofu, Yamanashi Oct 13th - Izu, Shizuoka Oct 14th - Yaizu, Shizuoka Oct 16th - Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Oct 17th - Tokoname, Aichi Oct 18th - Kyoto, Kyoto Oct 19th - Kadoma, Osaka Oct 20th - Himeji, Hyogo Oct 22nd - Aki, Kochi Oct 23rd - Kurashiki, Okayama Oct 24th - Izumo, Shimane Oct 25th - Mihara, Hiroshima Oct 26th - Hiroshima, Hiroshima Oct 27th - Fukuyama, Hiroshima
  17. Yubinhaad

    Latest kabu-babu changes

    Former Maegashira Shotenro has switched from the Kasugayama myoseki (owned by Ikioi) to the Kitajin myoseki (owned by Endo), it was announced earlier.
  18. Four promotions for the next banzuke, two newcomers and two returnees. Debut: Asagyokusei (朝玉勢, formerly Tamaki) - Takasago-beya - last basho Mk3e, 4-3 Kaisho - Asakayama - Mk4w, 4-3 Return: Seiro - shikoroyama - Mk1e, 5-2 Irodori - Shikoroyama - Mk1w, 4-3 Tamaki's new shikona is nice, the middle kanji is from his family name while the third honours his hometown of Ise, Mie prefecture. Congratulations to Asakayama-beya and Kaisho, the first sekitori for former Ozeki Kaio! I'm surprised he was ahead of Wakamotoharu though.
  19. Yubinhaad

    Sumo Reference Updates

    The final records of Hitenryu and Tochikasuga are a bit mixed up - Hitenryu won their Senshuraku bout to finish 6-1, leaving Tochikasuga at 5-2.
  20. Yubinhaad

    Games Talk Nagoya 2019

    After being dead last on Shonichi, what remained of my Hoshitori entry somehow mustered a comeback to clinch the first sansho of my career. Only took 111 basho!
  21. Yubinhaad

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    Because of the arrows. The are never given to a MK rikishi I don't think that has anything to do with it, on the final day of 2018 Kyushu the third-to-last bout was a make-koshi affair between Kagayaki (5-10) and Ichinojo (6-9).
  22. Yubinhaad

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    How come Komusubi Abi had the third-to-last bout on senshuraku, with Sekiwake Tamawashi fourth-from-last? Obviously I see that there was more on the line in the Abi-Kotoshogiku 7-7 bout, but I didn't think that could override the rank privilege.
  23. Yubinhaad

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    Yesterday we saw a rare Day 13 kinboshi, but Kotoshogiku's win today is only the 6th kinboshi to be won on Day 14, and the first to happen away from the Kokugikan(s). Basho Winner Rank Yokozuna 1973 Aki Onishiki M11w Kotozakura 1974 Aki Ryuko M9w Kitanoumi 1975 Hatsu Mienoumi M6w Wajima 1984 Aki Konishiki M6w Chiyonofuji 2017 Hatsu Takanoiwa M10e Hakuho 2019 Nagoya Kotoshogiku M5e Hakuho Meanwhile, this is Kotoshogiku's third kinboshi since losing his Ozeki rank, drawing him level with Mitsuneyama for most kinboshi won by a former Ozeki. Overall it is the 17th such kinboshi. Basho Day Winner Rank Yokozuna 1933 Natsu 4 Noshirogata M1w Tamanishiki 1949 Natsu 6 Shionoumi M2w Azumafuji 1952 Aki 5 Nayoroiwa M3w Chiyonoyama 1957 Hatsu 7 Mitsuneyama M2e Kagamisato 1957 Natsu 2 Mitsuneyama M6e Kagamisato " " 7 Ouchiyama M1e Tochinishiki 1957 Aki 3 Mitsuneyama M2e Chiyonoyama 1976 Haru 12 Kaiketsu M1e Kitanoumi 2002 Kyushu 5 Takanonami M1e Musashimaru 2003 Hatsu 7 Dejima M3w Takanohana 2003 Nagoya 4 Takanonami M3e Musashimaru 2007 Hatsu 3 Dejima M1w Asashoryu 2007 Haru 2 Miyabiyama M3e Asashoryu 2008 Aki 3 Miyabiyama M1w Asashoryu 2017 Aki 3 Kotoshogiku M1w Harumafuji 2018 Hatsu 4 Kotoshogiku M2w Kisenosato 2019 Nagoya 14 Kotoshogiku M5e Hakuho
  24. Yubinhaad

    Kyujo Updates for 2019 Nagoya

    Just filling in for Fukurou who seems to be kyujo herself at the moment. Here are the absentees for the start of the basho. MAKUUCHI Ozeki Takakeisho M11e Yoshikaze MAKUSHITA Mk6e Chiyonokuni Mk56w Tsushimanada SANDANME Sd1e Tennozan Sd2w Obamaumi Sd62e Fukunofuji Sd64e Tokiryu Sd72e Ariake Sd73e Kotonoumi Sd76w Ura Sd78e Hao Sd88w Sadanohana Sd94w Mitsuuchi Sd97e Surugafuji JONIDAN Jd28w Aomihama Jd48w Nankairiki Jd52e Ryubu Jd56w Wakaseiun Jd80e Chiyotaiyo Jd83e Otsuji Jd90w Kotourasaki Jd95w Tsuyasato Jd97w Mimori Jd98w Denpoya Jd109w Ayaminato JONOKUCHI Jk23w Asahimaru Jk26e Murata Jk33w Taiga Banzuke-gai Omura said when the banzuke came out that his injury was 80% healed and he plans to participate in maezumo (perhaps a one-bout-and-out job). I've also heard Urutora may be ready to begin yet another comeback as well, but we'll have to wait and see if that happens. Odake-beya reported that Sandanme yobidashi Takahiro retired for personal reasons as of May 25th, after 13 years in the job.
  25. Yubinhaad

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    I'm happy enough with Tomokaze winning the 13th Day 13 kinboshi (although the first one was on the senshuraku of that 13-day basho). In addition, it's the 15th kinboshi won by a rikishi ranked at Maegashira 7, in the second basho of the Reiwa era. The last such kinboshi was won by Itai just over three decades ago in the second basho of the Heisei era, also on Day 13.