Yubinhaad

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Everything posted by Yubinhaad

  1. Yubinhaad

    Ounomatsu Oyakata kyujo for Nagoya

    Sakaigawa-oyakata (former Komusubi Ryogoku) will stand in for the absent Onomatsu this basho. He did the same last March for Nishonoseki after his accident.
  2. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke for Nagoya 2019

    But not for Nagoya - Kyodo reports that Onomatsu-oyakata (former Sekiwake Masurao) will sit out the basho as he is in poor health and is being treated for high blood pressure.
  3. Yubinhaad

    Tokoyama training

    A few pictures showing some lower-ranking tokoyama being taught the tricks of their trade in the shitaku-beya. Edit: Images re-uploaded.
  4. Yubinhaad

    Banzuke for Nagoya 2019

    Eight shikona changes on this banzuke. Kotokamatani's change to Kotonowaka - the shikona of his father and shisho - was announced with his Juryo promotion. There's also a nod to his grandfather, the 53rd Yokozuna Kotozakura, by changing his given name to Masahiro - the first kanji is taken from Kotozakura's given name Masakatsu. (Rather confusingly, Kotokamatani's given name was already Masakatsu but with two different kanji) Takemasa must be feeling very genki these days, although that's not quite what his new shikona means. This particular Genki is also an imperial era name from the 16th century, the third of four which span the reign of Emperor Ogimachi. Yoshikasuga's new shikona has three distinct parts - the first kanji is another reading of that from the shisho's old shikona Asahisato, the second kanji means bravery or courage, while the third is another reading of Saiwai, his home ward in Kawasaki, Kanagawa prefecture. After seven indifferent basho, Miyakomotoharu has returned to his original shikona of Miyakojima, also reversing the given name change made at the same time. Another previous shikona is claimed back in Futagoyama-beya, where Yabuoka has convinced the shisho that he is again worthy of the shikona Raiga, which was taken away from him last year. Kise-beya's Higonoso only had two basho with that shikona, now changing to Yashiroumi, an homage (with a slightly different reading) to the Yatsushiro Sea, which his hometown Yatsushiro looks over from Kumamoto prefecture on mainland Kyushu. Newcomer Maruyama makes his banzuke debut with the shikona Marusho. This was actually visible on the keikoba ranking board in some of the pictures from Naruto-beya's formal opening recently, but I couldn't quite make out the second kanji at the time. Finally, Terunohana makes a fresh start after returning from a drop off the banzuke, changing his shikona to Taiga. The second kanji there is the same as that used in Futagoyama-beya, most likely ex-Miyabiyama was asked for his blessing for it to be used in this case. J14w Kotokamatani Masakatsu > Kotonowaka Masahiro (琴ノ若 傑太) Mk14e Takemasa > Genki (元亀) Sd26e Yoshikasuga > Kyokuyuko (旭勇幸) Jd31e Miyakomotoharu Tsuchida > Miyakojima Motoharu (都島 元晴) Jd96w Yabuoka > Raiga (雷雅) Jd102w Higonoso > Yashiroumi (八代海) Jk27e Maruyama > Marusho (丸勝) Jk33w Terunohana > Taiga (大雅) One other note courtesy of Nikkan, a shusshin change for Kawabuchi. Previously Ishikawa-ken, Kanazawa-shi > now Osaka-fu, Osaka-shi, Minato-ku (大阪府大阪市港区).
  5. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi or heya support events

    Shibatayama-beya and their supporters gathered at Tokyo's Keio Plaza hotel to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the heya's opening.
  6. Yubinhaad

    Yearly Kimarite Records

    Sorry I didn't see this until now. I've put the annual totals from 1992 to 2018 in this Google sheet. If you want it separated into the individual divisions I'm afraid you'll have to wait a while longer, I've been successfully kicking that can down the road for quite some time already. Let me know if you have any trouble accessing the sheet, I've never actually used that before but I think I've done it correctly.
  7. Yubinhaad

    Retirees May 2019

    Ikeru joined Onomatsu-beya after graduating from Saitama Sakae high school, at the recommendation of sumo department director Yamada. His career began with a Jonokuchi yusho, but while technically adept he was also injury prone, and his career suffered several length interruptions. Ikeru would twice more win the Jonokuchi yusho after returning from injuries, but persistent neck and hip problems ultimately brought an end to his career. His danpatsu-shiki took place on senshuraku but I was waiting to see if the okamisan would post some pictures, which she finally did the other day.
  8. Yubinhaad

    Retirees after Haru 2019

    His earlier shikona, Notononami, was taken from Ishikawa's Noto Peninsula, on which his hometown Nanao is located. The change to Burinosato was inspired by his fisherman father, buri (yellowtail) being a speciality of Nanao. A few more pictures from the danpatsu-shiki:
  9. Five promotions, four newcomers, one old shikona. Debut: Kotonowaka (琴ノ若, formerly Kotokamatani) - Sadogatake-beya - last basho Mk2e, 4-3 Ichiyamamoto - Nishonoseki - Mk3e, 5-2 Kizakiumi - Kise - Mk3w, 5-2 Ryuko - Onoe - Mk4e, 6-1 Return: Takanofuji - Chiganoura - Mk2w, 7-0 Yusho No sign of the intai list yet, but I can tell you that Soranoumi, Shunba and three-time Jonokuchi yusho winner Ikeru are among those calling it a day.
  10. Yubinhaad

    Retirees after Haru 2019

    I almost forgot but Hamatensei's danpatsu-shiki finally took place last month as reported by Akinomaki, so here are a few pictures, rather distant and a bit blurry, but better than nothing.
  11. Yubinhaad

    Tokoyama training

    As usual in June there is no jungyo, so the tokoyama have once again assembled in the shitaku-beya to hold their training workshops. The rikishi models this time were Dewanoumi-beya's Yamato (in the white top) and Isegahama-beya's Tsubakifuji (in blue).
  12. Hi all, below are the kimarite statistics for the first basho of the Reiwa era. Oshidashi was the most common kimarite here, accounting for 27.49% of torikumi, surpassing its previous best of 27.37% from 2018 Aki. Together, oshidashi and yorikiri accounted for 53.68% of torikumi, again surpassing the previous best combined mark from 2018 Aki. In one of those strange coincidences, yoritaoshi and oshitaoshi both registered their second-lowest percentages in the current kimarite era, accounting for only 4.25% and 2.62% of torikumi respectively. (Yoritaoshi's low was 4.14% in 2015 Nagoya, oshitaoshi was 2.58% in 2008 Haru) Among the rare kimarite this basho was an excellent izori from Kaishu, whose impressive agility sees him add that to the two tasukizori wins he had under his mawashi already. In the top division, Terutsuyoshi got a couple of kake-te wins which are well worth a look. On Day 7 he brought down Enho with a well-timed susoharai footsweep. Two days later, the much larger Chiyomaru was on the receiving end of an okurigake leg trip. It's the first time okurigake has been seen at sekitori level, and only the 4th time overall since it was introduced to the kimarite list in 2001. Chiyomaru was also the fall guy to one of the two ashitori wins from Makuuchi debutant Enho. I thought it might be called as komatasukui considering the way it was applied, when compared to Enho's earlier ashitori against Sadanoumi, but perhaps the key is that Chiyomaru was pushed out of the dohyo like Sadanoumi, rather than falling down. Back in the lower divisions, after an initial leg trip attempt went nowhere, Matsuda switched to one of his favourite moves, picking up the 7th nichonage win of his career as a result. Meanwhile, Tamakongo was driven back to the tawara but saved the day with a last-ditch nimaigeri, with a mono-ii confirming his victory. It's a rare departure from his otherwise orthodox kimarite history. Finally, Ayanoumi struggled at his highest career rank this basho, but he did get the 5th uchimuso win of his career. Good to see Tobizaru reach double-digit wins for the first time in his career, which should earn him a promotion out of the double-digit Juryo ranks for the first time too. Among his wins was the 5th kekaeshi of his career, against the same opponent that he beat with a ketaguri on the same day last basho. Among active rikishi I believe only Kizenryu - another Nichidai graduate - has more kekaeshi wins, with 6. Speaking of Kizenryu, he almost provided a second nichonage for the basho on Day 11, but apparently the attempted trip wasn't quite enough for the duty kimarite-gakari, so the bout was recorded as a kotenage instead. Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 1 0 0 1 2 0 4 0.16% Amiuchi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ashitori 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 0.12% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0.08% Fusen (default) 4 0 1 2 4 1 12 0.48% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Harimanage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hatakikomi 31 22 44 67 54 6 224 8.90% Hikiotoshi 11 3 14 18 23 2 71 2.82% Hikkake 0 0 0 4 1 0 5 0.20% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Isamiashi 0 0 0 1 1 5 7 0.28% Izori 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Kainahineri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Kakenage 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 0.12% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 3 5 4 5 5 1 23 0.91% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 1 0 2 8 4 0 15 0.60% Kimetaoshi 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 0.12% Kirikaeshi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0.12% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotenage 9 4 7 11 12 2 45 1.79% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Kubinage 1 0 1 0 3 1 6 0.24% Makiotoshi 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04% Okuridashi 2 5 11 23 28 7 76 3.02% Okurigake 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04% Okuritaoshi 1 1 1 2 9 1 15 0.60% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 82 55 105 208 184 58 692 27.49% Oshitaoshi 9 6 8 13 21 9 66 2.62% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 0.12% Shitatehineri 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Shitatenage 2 2 13 11 20 8 56 2.22% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0.08% Sotogake 0 0 0 1 5 0 6 0.24% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 5 4 10 6 16 4 45 1.79% Susoharai 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.04% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04% Tottari 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0.08% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 12 7 15 10 14 5 63 2.50% Tsukihiza 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 0.16% Tsukiotoshi 17 11 20 27 23 7 105 4.17% Tsukitaoshi 1 0 4 3 3 2 13 0.52% Tsukite 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 1 1 1 0 0 1 4 0.16% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchimuso 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.04% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 1 1 3 0 5 0.20% Uwatedashinage 5 3 6 5 9 3 31 1.23% Uwatehineri 1 0 1 1 3 0 6 0.24% Uwatenage 10 5 15 28 42 13 113 4.49% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 79 57 105 175 187 56 659 26.18% Yoritaoshi 10 1 21 20 38 17 107 4.25% Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Izori. Okurigake.
  13. Yubinhaad

    2019 Natsu - Kimarite Statistics

    Thank you for this kimarite post, always very interesting. But I guess here you meant from the beginning of Heisei, unless you considered another type of era... Absolutely right. Sorry about that, I think I usually write "current kimarite era". I don't know why I missed it this time, especially with the potential confusion of mentioning the new Imperial era in my opening line. Thanks for the catch, I'll correct it now. Perhaps, at least for yoritaoshi, there was slightly less desperate resisting at the edge?
  14. Yubinhaad

    Rikishi or heya support events

    Dewanoumi-beya held a small gathering during the Natsu basho to celebrate the kanreki, 60th birthday, of sewanin Fukuryudake. (Doesn't exactly belong here but I wanted to post it somewhere, we don't get a lot of coverage of these hard-working men.) A toast from Dewanoumi-oyakata (former Maegashira Oginohana). A speech from the birthday boy. And a picture of the attendees. The only one I don't recognise is the man in the light blue shirt, perhaps the heya manager? Standing from left: Takasaki-oyakata (ex-Kinkaiyama) / unknown / Dekiyama-oyakata (ex-Dewanohana) / Mitakeumi / Kimura Chishu / Nakadachi-oyakata (ex-Oginishiki). Seated from left: previous Dewanoumi-oyakata (ex-Washuyama) / current Dewanoumi-oyakata / Fukuryudake / former Yamashina-oyakata (ex-Onishiki).
  15. Yubinhaad

    Juryo Promotions for 2019 Nagoya

    The press articles reveal that Ichiyamamoto's shikona was suggested by a former president of the sumo department at Chuo University, who felt that 9 kanji strokes was auspicious in some way. He has since passed away and Ichiyamamoto didn't want to change it yet. He will consider it if and when he reaches a higher level. That aside, it's great to see Nishonoseki-oyakata looking well and happy after his accident a while back.
  16. Yubinhaad

    Retirees May 2019

    35-year-old Soranoumi retires after 20 years on the ozumo dohyo. He joined Hanakago-beya in 1999, but when that closed in 2012 he and his fellow survivors moved to Minezaki-beya. He recently got married. Terunofuji is now the last surviving rikishi from Magaki-beya as his loyal tsukebito, 37-year-old Shunba, retires after 15 years in ozumo. After graduating from Kyorin University in Tokyo he joined Magaki-beya in 2004, needing to pass the secondary physical examinations. An early highlight was winning the Jonidan yusho in the 2005 Kyushu basho - Jonosuke reported his comments at the time: When Magaki-beya closed in 2013 the three surviving rikishi moved to Isegahama-beya. In the 2017 Haru basho Shunba made his Makushita debut at 35 years and 2 months, even managing a 6-1 record there. However he gradually slipped down to Jonidan and was absent for the last two basho. Hokutoshin retires after seven years, and will now work in a restaurant in his hometown of Yawata, Kyoto. Tamanoryu's intai was announced ahead of the basho, I could only find a single picture from his danpatsu-shiki. An Izu Shimbun article reported that Tochihiryu's danpatsu-shiki will take place at Kasugano-beya on June 3rd.
  17. Yubinhaad

    Turn The Tide - Banzuke Natsu 2019

    Due to my faulty arithmetic a correction is needed to those numbers: it should have read 150 perfect scores by 52 different players, after 2019 Haru. Sorry about that. Coming now to this basho, shoutout to Gernobono for his new personal best Shukun-sho score, which is also the 10th-highest score ever recorded. It's not easy to get a kachi-koshi and a double-digit score, in fact this is only the third such score (of 23 overall) to actually win the Shukun-sho. The foundation of Gernobono's performance was his three perfect scores, equalling the record set by Taikanute in 2016 Natsu and 2016 Kyushu. They were among 9 perfect scores in this basho, breaking the previous record of 8 set in 2018 Haru. And remarkably, four of those perfect scores came on Day 2, breaking the previous record of three on the same day, set on Day 14 of 2015 Nagoya and Day 10 of 2018 Haru.
  18. Yubinhaad

    Natsu jungyo 2019

    The Kyokai announced the full schedule for this jungyo - 21 separate events, with the visit to Sapporo taking two days. No doubting who will be the star attraction at the Toyama event on August 1st! Jul 28th - Gifu, Gifu prefecture Jul 29th - Habikino, Osaka Jul 30th - Kusatsu, Shiga Jul 31st - Echizen, Fukui Aug 1st - Toyama, Toyama Aug 2nd - Matsumoto, Nagano Aug 3rd - Tokorozawa, Saitama Aug 4th - Togane, Chiba Aug 6th - Tachikawa, Tokyo Aug 7th - Chichibu, Saitama Aug 8th - Utsunomiya, Tochigi Aug 9th - Koriyama, Fukushima Aug 10th - Fukushima, Fukushima Aug 11th - Sendai, Miyagi Aug 12th - Murayama, Yamagata Aug 13th - Aomori, Aomori Aug 14th - Kitatsugaru-gun, Aomori Aug 16th - Hakodate, Hokkaido Aug 17th/18th - Sapporo, Hokkaido Aug 19th - Kushiro, Hokkaido Aug 25th - KITTE Basho, Tokyo
  19. Yubinhaad

    Trivia bits

    Asanoyama has won the: 10th Makuuchi yusho by a rikishi from Toyama prefecture, and the first for 103 years, since Tachiyama in 1916 Natsu. 9th Makuuchi yusho by a rikishi with no sanyaku experience, and the first for 58 years, following Sadanoyama in 1961 Natsu. First Makuuchi yusho by a rikishi who started as a Sandanme Tsukedashi. Yusho winners with no sanyaku experience Basho Winner 1909 Natsu M7e Takamiyama 1914 Natsu M14e Ryogoku 1922 Haru M4e Tsurugahama 1926 Natsu M8w Orochiyama 1931 October M4e Ayazakura 1945 Natsu M1e Bishuyama 1960 Natsu M4w Wakamisugi 1961 Natsu M13w Sadanoyama 2019 Natsu M8w Asanoyama
  20. Yubinhaad

    Lower-division Torikumi Natsu Basho 2019

    13 Daigonishiki (Jk2e) 2-2 Sawaisamu (Jk5w) 2-2   The 10th over-40s bout that I know of, and a first meeting for these two veterans, with a combined age of 83 years, 10 months and some odd days. There are now 15 rikishi aged 40 or over. Gorikiyama celebrated his birthday during the Haru basho, Kainowaka in April, and lastly Koshinoryu on Day 6. I hope people in Fukui are cheering for their only two representatives on the ozumo dohyo; Koshinoryu lost on his birthday but has won twice since to improve to 3-2, while Maikeru is an impressive 5-0 in his Makushita debut.
  21. Kaisei sustained a right bicep tendon injury (右上腕二頭筋腱断裂) in his bout against Ryuden - I noticed he immediately reached for it with his left hand at the end of the bout. He will have a detailed scan at hospital, return is unlikely according to Tomozuna-oyakata (former Sekiwake Kyokutenho). Haven't seen any specific info for Ichinojo yet, but Minato-oyakata (former Maegashira Minatofuji) confirmed that he had right knee pain before the basho (some of our sharp-eyed posters spotted he had taping on it), and that worsened day by day. Return is possible.
  22. Kaisei is kyujo from Day 8 due to a bicep injury in his right arm (sounds similar to Hakuho's injury). Myogiryu will pick up the fusensho.
  23. Yubinhaad

    UDH Natsu Basho 2019

    Well if you have the time, please do! I'd welcome a proper check of my work, which was a simple page-by-page visual check (incidentally, the page for Day 8 of 2017 Haru is blank). I count 15 perfect scores in the available records, the last from Flohru on Day 4 of 2012 Kyushu.
  24. Yubinhaad

    UDH Natsu Basho 2019

    It's there for me. Susanoo with the first 38 score for almost exactly two years, according to my notes. And just one point short of the first perfect score since 2012!
  25. Yubinhaad

    New recruits for Natsu 2019

    Sounds like Araoyama. All three Kokonoe recruits have shikona for maezumo, the only one I'm certain of for now is Yamamoto, Chiyotensho (千代天勝). Suzuki sounds like Chiyokozan, and I'm not sure about Ejima yet. Late edit: Sounds like Aikawa is using his given name Shiryu as his shikona. Terunohana and Kotoyamato are returning from banzuke-gai after lengthy absences. Terunohana has missed the last four basho, while Kotoyamato has been out of action for just over a year.