sekitori

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Everything posted by sekitori

  1. sekitori

    Next Yokozuna??????

    Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent injury by performing "right sumo". That's because "right sumo" which theoretically should prevent injury, doesn't exist. It doesn't really take much for a rikishi to twist a knee more than expected, not protect his back properly when encountering large strong opponents, fall the wrong way, and undergo many other mishaps. Sumo may be the ultimate atheltic activity having to do with bodily contact and injury is part of the game. Almost every rikishi gets hurt, although Kyokutenho seems to be one of the rare exceptions. While he had a long and successful career and even won a yusho, because of his style which kept him from being badly injured, he was never a threat to reach the highest ranks. When people talk about future yokozunas, ozekis, etc., they refer to rikishis who have excellent tecnique and use it to its ultimate efffect. There is a very fine line between doing that and going just beyond what the human body can tolerate. The degree to which a rikishi is injured and how well he recovers can spell the difference between great success and mediocrity. There are two very simple words to bear in mind concerning any potentially outstanding rikishi. Those words are "barring injury".
  2. sekitori

    What rikishi do you miss the most?

    Chiyonofuji. When I started watching sumo, I noticed a rikishi who looked completely different from all the others. Although he didn't weigh very much, he was very athletic and extremely quick. However, he was 25 years old and although he had reached komusubi, he had never won a yusho. It was so good to see him win his first one. I thought it would be wonderful if he could win another two or three before his career was over. As things eventally turned out, he won 30 more..
  3. sekitori

    Any thoughts about this kimarite?

    Thanks. That's probably it. But I will continue to call it shitatehineri. The reason is that I want to own a sculpture that depicts a winning technique, not a non-contact stumble by the loser.
  4. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    If Hakuho can win quickly, fine. It it takes him longer to do that (even quite a bit longer), that's okay with him, too. In this case, it was only a matter of time until he defeated Myogiryu. I don't understand why people complain that he doesn't finish off his opponents sooner. The object is not to win quickly. It's to win--period. And as far as I know, Hakuho is far better at doing that than anyone else around.
  5. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    Attempting to enforce having both hands touch the dohyo may be relatively new, but I'm sure that the rule itself is quite old. It states that the tachi-ai can begin only after both fists of each rikishi touch the ground at or behind the shikiri-sen. Over the years, that rule has been corrupted to the point where very few rikishis comply with it. If you want to see how it should be done, look at Yoshikaze and Tomokaze.
  6. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    No matter how loudly he screamed at them, neither Meisei nor Hokutofuji got both hands on the ground at the tach-ai. I think that possibly after several more mattas, they both would have gotten the idea that the gyoji wanted both hands touching the dohyo and they probably eventually would have done so. But if it took that long to happen, people would have blamed the gyoji for unnecessarily prolonging the match. The problem is that the rikishis were at fault, not the gyoji. Kimura Konosuke was only trying to enforce a rule that apparently no one else seems to care about. It must be be extremely frustrating for a referee to try enforcing a rule which apparently is virtually ignored.
  7. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    I doubt if Enho getting more attention will bother Hakuho at all. He knows that training with him has done much to increase Enho's effectiveness and I'm sure he's very proud of that fact. Hakuho, who has been far more successful than any rikishi in history, only cares about winning yushos. He's expected to get the championship in every tournament he enters and when he does (which is now almost a routine occurrence), I'm sure he'll be more than happy to have his success equalled and maybe even overshadowed by Enho's--which so far has been totally unexpected and to a great part, due to his efforts.
  8. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    It all depends on the meaning of the phrase "went out". Endo definitely touched the clay first. At that time, Takayasu was also out of the ring but he was in midair, not even close to touching the ground. I thought the rules are that the first rikishi to touch the ground with anything but the soles of his feet is the loser. If that's the case, Endo was clearly the loser. This was another very strange decision.
  9. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    Anyone who rises to ozeki after being demoted to the mid-makushita ranks should be applauded, not ridiculed. Because he no longer seems to produce ozeki-like sumo, that's no reason to belittle what he has done in the past. I think the word "fraud" describing his present status is an extremely poor, totally unnecessary description. If it seems that if he was on PEDs, I would like to see absolute proof that he was.
  10. sekitori

    Nagoya 2019 Discussion (here be spoilers)

    Hakuho's objective is to win--period. I'm sure he doesn't care in the least if doing that takes one second, one minute, or even longer. In his prime, he would have still taken as much time as needed to gain an advantage. There are many reasons why he's the greatest of all. One of the major ones is his seemingly infinite patience.
  11. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Tochinoshin was a komusubi and fell from there to the mid-makushita ranks. Ryuden's rise was equally if not even more pronounced. He dropped from juryo 12 to as low as jonokuchi 14 and for four consecutive bashos, he won exactly one bout and then went kyujo. The only reason he competed was to not completely fall off the banzuke. The subsequent rise of both rikishis has been amazing. Takekeisho's return to the highest ranks won't be nearly as difficult. At best, he will start at sekiwake. At worst, he should begin his comeback at no lower than a rank close to that. I agree that these are all instances where the judgment of the rikishi and his advisors to completely recover from injury before competing again was extremely wise. I have a suggestion that I'm sure would be too radical for those running sumo to consider. Instead of leaving the decision to enter a basho entirely up to the rikishi, his oyakata, and other advisors, I would also suggest examination by several medical professionals as well. If it's their unanimous opinion that a rikishi should not compete because his injury is too severe, their recommendation should at the very least be taken extremely seriously by everyone concerned.
  12. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    When Takakeisho returns in September, suppose that he doesn't get his ten wins. Due to prolonged inactivity in competition (in boxing it's called ring rust), that could happen. Would it be disappointing? Absolutely. Would it be a tragedy? Absolutely not. He's still very young and very talented. Barring further injury, it's almost certain that he will again be able to put together another record that will result in promotion to ozeki. I expect him to maintain that rank (and possibly go one step higher) for a very long time. The only thing that can stop him is further severe injury. In sumo, that unfortunately is always a possibility.
  13. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Takakeisho's advisors have two choices. The first is allowing him to compete in Nagoya and hope that without much training and a knee that may not be fully healed, he can somehow get eight wins and retain his ozeki rank. The problem is that re-injury in such a situation is quite possible and if the injury is severe enough, it could affect his entire career. The second, much more logical choice would be to have him sit out Nagoya and be demoted to sekiwake for the Aki basho. By then, his knee would have almost certainly be healed and he will be able to do the necessary training to be ready. Whereas Tochinoshin's return to ozeki was somewhat doubtful before the Natsu basho, a healthy Takakeisho should have no problem getting at least a 10-5 record and his ozeki rank again. I like his oyakata's comment that by taking a reasonable approach. he will still have a long career ahead even if he goes kyujo in Nagoya. It's a refreshing change from those advisors who allow injured rikishis who are not ready to compete to do so for no other reason than to avoid dropping further down the banzuke. Not only do they most often have make-koshi records, but they also increase the possibliity of having additional injury. The best example of this kind of mismanagement was the situation concerning Endo's torn ACL. If he had surgery resulting in a sound knee, he was talented enough to have overcome a fairly severe drop in rank and become the highly successful rikishi that many had predicted he would be. Instead, he was allowed to continue competing without the surgery. As a result, his knee was permanenty weakened and that probably led to other injuries. The bottom line was that he was never the same after his knee injury. Would he have become an ozeki or a yokozuna with a fully healed, much stronger knee? We'll never know, but one thing is certain. He would be a much better rikishi than he is now.
  14. sekitori

    Araiso activities

    I can think of a couple of reasons why rikishis are not allowed to drive and I can see how they could affect rules concerning their behavior. Rikishis are unusually large people who are operating vehicles designed for much smaller individuals. They may not feel completely comfortable in such an environment and that could affect their judgment when operating a vehicle--which could result in an accident. This doesn't make much sense to me but it could to the people who are running sumo. A second and more logical reason is that rikishis are known to consume large quantities of alcohol. I'm sure driving under the influence of alcohol is illegal in Japan and if a rikishi is found to be driving while intoxicated, that will negatively affect the way sumo is perceived by the public. It almost certainly will result in severe penalties to the riksihi both in legal terms and his standing in the sumo community. If they are unable to operate an automobile, there seems to be no limit as to how much alcohol rikishis can drink. I would think that excessive drinking by rikishis would never be penalized by those in charge as long as they report for training in sober condtion--unless of course it results in hitting someone else with a bottle or a remote control.
  15. sekitori

    Banzuke for Nagoya 2019

    I really like him but unfortunately, I think it's quite probable that he won't be very successful in Nagoya. He is at a level where he now will face all the top contenders. The only high ranking rikishi he defeated last time was the extremly inconsistent Goeido. He lost to Tamawashi and Mitakeumi. He should have also lost to Tochinoshin but because of a terrible mistake by the shimpan, he was given the victory. I believe that if he comes up with a 6-9 record, he will be doing very well.
  16. sekitori

    Hakuho Injures Arm Haru Basho 2019

    The Lakers are looking for accurate 3 point shooters. Do you think they could be interested in someone who is fairly tall (6'4", 192 cm) but weighs considerably more than the average NBA guard? He shoots quite well and is very agile and strong. If they want another superstar to go along with LeBron James and Anthony Davis, they may have found one in Munkhbat Davaajargal.
  17. sekitori

    Enhou injured

    Although it may be another kind of injury, it sounds like a groin pull. The attendant's hands seem to be touching the area of the adductor longus muscle, the one most often strained in a groin pull. If it is, it's the same kind of injury that sidelined LeBron James for 17 games last season. And when he returned, the muscle still hadn't completely healed. I've had this kind of injury because of exercise overuse (using a rowing macine for long periods of time several days a week over many years). Ice applications and compression are of some immediate help. The photo shows that the injured area seems to be toward the center or belly of the muscle (like Hakuho's torn bicep). If it is, the primary treatment is rest, possibly for quite a whiile--the length of time depending on the severity of the injury. Groin pulls heal very slowly and if Enho does have a moderately severe one, he will probably be kyujo for Nagoya. If it's a only a mild injury, he could be ready in time to enter. The only time surgery is an option is if the injury is extremely severe or if the tendon is involved. It's a last resort and is hardly ever necessary. I'm a big Enho fan and I hope that he will recover soon.
  18. sekitori

    Hakuho Injures Arm Haru Basho 2019

    I find it interesting how the size of athletes in any sports is perceived. For example, in the NBA, a "small" forward is usually between 6 feet 6 inches (198 cm) and 6 feet 10 inches (208 cm) tall. In this case, the word "small" is relative. The weight of the average NFL linebacker, where speed, agility, and strength are emphasized, is around 245 pounds (just over 110 kg). Compared to the average American male, these people are huge. Calling Enho "little" is true when related to sumo. Compared to rikishis like Ichinojo, Kaisei, Aoiyama, and Gagamaru, "tiny" and "miniscule"are better words . Yet he is only slightly shorter than the average Japanese male but he weighs about 70 pounds (32kg) more. In other words, if you saw him walking down the street, you would think that this is an unusually large person. In real life, he is. In sumo, he definitely is not. The special thing about Enho beside his small size, is that he also looks very young. No wonder why people want to hug him.
  19. sekitori

    Hakuho Injures Arm Haru Basho 2019

    I disagree about "Poor" Enho. He is facing the absolute best rikishi ever and if that consists of constantly being thrown around and learning something by having it done to him, that's to his benefit This is the best training he could ever have and I'm sure he appreciates it.
  20. sekitori

    Natsu basho 2019 discussions [SPOILERS]

    I notice that one of several YouTube videos of the Tochinoshin-Asanoyama bout had the following title--"Tochinoshin VS Asanoyama 2019. Japanese referee helps his countryman Asanoyama". It made it seem as if the gyoji made the wrong call on purpose to help a Japanese rikishi win. That assumption was completely false. The fact was that the gyoji made the call that Tochinoshin had won. It was the shimpan who overturned his correct decision. I just wish that people contributing to YouTube or anything else on the Internet would have at least some idea of what they're talking about. The person submitting this video obviously had absolutely no clue as to what had happened. But because many people believe everything they see and hear on the Internet, they assumed that title had to be correct and that gyojis can and often do favor Japanese rikishis. Nothing could be further from the truth.
  21. sekitori

    Rikishi calling a mono-ii

    At the end of the day, they're probably present in case a yokozuna loses, to protect the shimpan between them from being hit by flying zabutons. Since the shimpan are highly respected members of the sumo community, they rate being protected by two, not just one rikishi. On the other hand, because of some recent highly questionable decisions, it may be a good idea to have the shimpan stay ringside with as little protection as possible. That way, the public can voice its displeasure with those decisions by throwing pillows at them. Such a situation could be callled the "Tochinoshin Procedure".
  22. sekitori

    Hakuho Injures Arm Haru Basho 2019

    Even though his bicep may be 100% healed (right now it's supposedly at 70%), does not mean that it will be ready for competition. Once it has fully healed, Hakuho will have to strengthen it so that it can once again withstand heavy physical contact--and that will take time. Since I'm sure he will only compete in a basho when he feels he's physically able to, I still have doubts about his entering one that begins in only five more weeks with a bicep that's now still 30% short of being fully healed and nowhere near ready for sumo competition. My highly uneducated guess is that he will skip Nagoya in order to be completely ready for the Aki basho. On rare occasion however, my predictions have been proven to be somewhat (actually, completely) wrong.
  23. sekitori

    Natsu basho 2019 discussions [SPOILERS]

    To guess how many tournaments Hakuho will win before he retires is a game we probably all play. But it's really nothing more than conjecture. He could possibly win one or two more. He also may not win any more yushos at all--but even so, 42 is a rather nice number with which to finish a career. Hakuho is probably the most fierce competitor in sumo and he won't enter a basho unless he's in excellent physical condition. And a Hakuho in good shape has to be favored. In addition, he has something else working for him. It's called "ring sense" meaning that he knows his exact position on the dohyo at all times. Hakuho is human and human beings make mistakes. Those mistakes can turn into losses but having that sense along with amazing talent and agility can sometimes turn a probable loss into a win. The only other rikishi who had that sense to such a degree was Asashoryu. He once almost levitated off the ground when falling, allowing his opponent to touch the dohyo just before he did. Some may say that age is catching up to Hakuho, that he's more prone to injury, and that he isn't the same dominant force he has been in the past. They may be correct, but one fact still remains. When he's in good physical condition, he's still the best rikishi around. There is no reason why Hakuho can't win more than one or two more yushos before he finally retires. He's just that good. Just because an athlete is considered to be "over the hill" doesn't necessarily mean that his career is even close to being finished. Tiger Woods won the Masters after having eight surgeries on his knee and back and not having won a major golf tournament in many years. I doubt if many (or any) rikishis have had so much surgery. Tiger and Hakuho may be past their primes but they are still forces to be reckoned with. A couple of final statistics. I think these are being very close to correct and if I'm off a ittle bit, I apologize to Wakatake. Hakuho has been in Makunouchi for 90 bashos, but he sat out six of them, making 84 that he actually entered. He won the yusho in half of them, 42. He also "won" (if you could call coming in second "winning") the jun-yusho in 21 bashos. Those figures translate to a record of finishing first or second in a honbasho 75% of the time. When related to sumo, that figure is absolutely amazing. If it could be translated into one word, that word would be "greatness".
  24. sekitori

    Natsu basho 2019 discussions [SPOILERS]

    6. Hakuho wasn't present.
  25. sekitori

    Trump coming to the basho

    I'm far from being a fan of Donald Trump. That being said, I approved of his appearance on senshuraku. He carried it off with far more respect and dignity than I expected..