sekitori

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Everything posted by sekitori

  1. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    It's true that the kachiage in and of itself is far more dangerous than the headbutt. However, kachiages don't occur very often. The headbutt, while far less severe, happens extremely often in a rkishi's career and its long term effects can be much more serious. I'm referring to CTE, a brain injury which has been proven to occur in many American professional football players and can result in dementia in later life. Helmets provide some protection, but not enough to prevent it. I wonder if trauma to the brain is as common in rikishis who have a lot of head to head contact without any sort of protection at all. I would guess that it's far more prevalent than we realize. I have no idea how the effects of head to head contact in sumo can be reduced. Tradition indicates that any sort of head protection will never be used. Such contact could eventually be banned altogether. The chances of such a rule ever occurring is at least a million to one, maybe more. Meawhile, rikishis will continue to bang their heads together, at possibly great future risk.
  2. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    When Hakuho gripped onto Takakeisho's mawashi, because Takakeisho has very little yotsu-zumo ability, the bout was over. When two rikishis are grabbing onto each other's mawashis and there is no movement at all, there can be a question as to who has an advantage. That was not the case in this match. Hakuho was in complete control and he could have ended it any time he cared to. I still think the reason it took him so long to finish the match was to make it appear that Takakeisho's mawashi technique was moderately decent--which it definitely was not. Hakuho came away with the easiest win possible while Takakeisho left with his dignity intact by lasting well over a minute before losing. However, that result was due much, much more to Hakuho's efforts (or lack of same) than his own.
  3. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    This probably makes no sense, but I think Hakuho was doing Takakeisho a big favor. Once he controlled Takakeisho's mawashi, the match was over. But instead of pushing him off the dohyo right away, he just maintained his position. To some observers, it might appear that Takakesisho was doing something to block Hakuho's forward movement. But the lack of Hakuho's forward progress had nothing to do with Takakeisho's resistance. It was due entirely to Hakuho himself. I think the longer a bout with Hakuho lasts, the more impressive his opponent seems to be. I wouldn't doubt that while they were locked together, Hakuho whispered, "Hang in there. You're gonna lose but you stlll will look pretty good". As I said, this idea probably makes no sense but if nothing else, it does sound kind of interesting.
  4. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    That just about says it all. Not only is he the greatest rikishi ever, but he also is among the greatest all-time athletes in all sports. I would equate his status to that of LeBron James, Michael Jordan, Babe Ruth, Wayne Gretzky, and Muhammad Ali. The sad thing is while the others were extremely well-known, the vast (gigantic may be a better word) majority of people in the world have absolutely no idea who he is.
  5. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    It's absolutely right for a yokozuna, like any other rikishi, to follow the rules of sumo.That includes using accepted, allowable techniques. However, when one is promoted to yokozuna and becomes extremely successful, he is then requested to abandon a completely legal technique. It is said that such behavior is not worthy of someone holding such a high rank. Of course, his opponents can still use that same technique against him. The YDC and NSK sometimes come up with opinions that make no sense. This happens to be one of the more ridiculous ones. Hakuho is not being stubborn. He's just following the rules.
  6. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    I believe I understand why the sumo elders think so negatively about Hakuho's use of the harite and blows with his forearm. I doubt if it has anything to do with proper behavior for a yokozuna. I think the real reason is that Hakuho, who has won 42 yushos (and counting) and dominatied sumo like no one has ever before has been far more successful than they would like to see. They suggest that Hakuho stop the use of totally legal techniques, hoping that will provide some sort of handicap. They merely want to take away what they feel is an "unfair" advantage by the greatest rikishi of all time. That makes no sense to me at all. I don’t understand why complying with a rule and using it to one’s benefit can in any way be construed as being unfair. If the NSK feels that use of the harite and the forearm shiver are dangerous or provide some sort of undeserved advantage, all they have to do is make either or both of them illegal for all rikishis. If they don't, their "techniques unbecoming a yokozuna" statement means absolutely nothing, at least to me. I probably am in a minority regarding this thinking and I welcome any comments to the contrary.
  7. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    The harite is a legal tactic, but one that the elders for some reason consider to be improper for a yozuna to use. In Hakuho's case, he doesn't use it to cause damage. It's only for distraction and as such, it works well. If you want to see how lethal a single slap to the side of the head can be, check out this match between Kyokudozan and Kushimaumi.
  8. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    However, the yokozunas were kyujo in each of his yushos. That fact, in and of itself, made them less significant than they could have been. On the other hand, "a win is a win" no matter what the situation surrounding it is. Despite the fact that he didn't have to face his strongest competition, he stll did very well. There is no question that he deserved each yusho even though the quality of his opponents wasn't the best.
  9. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    I think a rule allowing a makunouchi rikishi who is absent for a long period due to injury to re-enter at mid-makushita rank would be quite fair. An injured juryo rikishi would be allowed re-enter at no lower than upper sandanme. What happened to Ura was completely unfair and totally undeserved. He was at M4 when he was badly injured. He was demoted to low sandanme where he rose to makushita 23 when he was injured again. He now has to start at jonidan 106. Faced with such a situation, I'm sure many rikishis would have retired. Such determination is why I'm a huge Ura fan. I think his previous high makunouchi rank should have been taken into account when his subsequent rankings were considered. Something like this should never be allowed to happen and is an excellent example (among others) showing that sumo is far, far from perfect.
  10. sekitori

    2019 Kyushu Basho Discussion (spoiler alert)

    In Kisenosato's case, consistency at ozeki meant nothing. In the five previous bashos before his first yusho, excluding a fairly decent 10-5, he was 13-2, 13-2, 12-3, and 12-3 which were yokozuna-like numbers. However, they did not include a yusho. Their result was his remaining at ozeki. Only when he finally won a yusho was he promoted to yokozuna. I believe that without a yusho, no matter how outstandingly consistent his records continued to be, he would have remained an ozeki.
  11. sekitori

    Ridiculous Predictions for Kyushu 2019

    Although it doesn't pertain to this basho the NSK, in order to link the names of Endo and Enho closer together, will find three new candidates and name them Eneo, Enfo, and Engo.
  12. sekitori

    Ridiculous Predictions for Kyushu 2019

    Mitakeumi will win with an 11-4 primarily because the yokozunas, ozekis, and other sanyaku rikishis will all have dropped out. The NSK, being desperate to find another Japanese grand champion, will determine that 23 wins and two consecutive yushos, no matter how weak the opposition was, will qualify him for yokozuna, skipping ozeki ranking. You want ridiculous predictions? You just got one.
  13. sekitori

    Pre-Kyushu predictions?

    Hakuho. He still has at least a couple of outstanding bashos remaining. This will be one of them.
  14. sekitori

    Preparations of the Y/O Kyushu 2019

    The advantage the emperor has over Hakuho is that he doesn't get smashed into by very strong people for fifteen consecutive days six times a year. Such events have a profound effect on the length of one's career.
  15. sekitori

    Banzuke for Kyushu 2019

    Ura is now at Jonidan 106. If he can't compete in Kyushu, how much lower can he be demoted? There are only three spots lower in Jonidan and 30 in Jonokuchi. Could he end up at the bottom of Jonokuchi? I find it difficult to accept that a rikishi with so much promise can be demoted to such an extremely low level, no matter how severely he has been injured. When he does start to compete again, he has an almost impossible task to climb well up the banzuke again. And even if he successfully reaches much higher ranking, the possibilty of further injury is always present. I'm a big fan of Ura's and I wish him well. I'm sure many others feel the way I do.
  16. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    The description of an injury can be very confusing. A broken arm can consist of a small hairline fracture. It can also be an extremely severe compound fracture. "Broken arm" in and of itself doesn't mean very much. Neither do the words "pectoral injury". As I mentioned previously, the only similarity between Kisenosato's and Takakeisho's injuries is that a tear of the pectoralis major muscle occurred. Kisenosato's involved the tendon at the top of the muscle while Takakeisho's was of the belly or middle of the muscle itself. Kisenosato's was much more severe, requiring surgery to heal properly. It was never performed. Takakeisho's course of treatment is having the muscle heal itself with time. No surgery is required. When "pectoral injury" is mentioned, think of "broken arm". There can be several interpretations for each one, some far more severe than others.
  17. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Tuitt's injury and Takakeisho's, while involviing the same muscle, are entirely different. Tuitt's resulted in a torn pectoral tendon. Takakeisho's was only to the muscle itself. His tendon was not affected. The treatment for Tuiitt's injury was season-ending surgery. The treatment for Takakeisho's is rest, with the torn muscle eventually healing by itself. The only question will be how long it will take for that healing to be complete.
  18. sekitori

    2019 a new record low most wins of the year ?

    Mitakeumi needs an 11-4 to reach 56 wins for the year. Because of his talent, that's possible. Because of his inconsistency, it may not be. Asanoyama must have a 12-3 which will be extremely difficult to achieve. It will take slightly more than a 9-6 average record for a rikishi to attain more than 56 wins for the year. What seems strange is that because of injuries, none of the yokozunas or ozekis (with the exception of Goeido who is a distinct long shot) will be able to do it. If Mitakeumi does reach or surpass 56 wins, he will achieve it with records so far of 8-4-3, 7-8, 9-6, 9-6, and 12-3. The fact that the most successful rikishi of 2019 will have will only have around 56 wins for the year seems very weird.
  19. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    There was a comment earlier about baseless speculation. I consider this to be a prime example of that. Where did you get that information? If you have specific knowledge that will back up your statement, please let us know.
  20. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    I can understand how oyakatas can control the lives of their rikishis. But I cannot understand how their medical treatment is also left pretty much up to them. The explanation probably is , "That's the way it always has been done". I believe that in the case of severe injury, sound medical advice should be given to both the rikishi and his advisors. Whether they care to do anything with such advice is another matter. I also believe that medical supervision should be present for rikishis with such injuries during training. Rikishis are strong-willed people who sometimes may do things that could hinder the healing process. Having a physical therapist or someone with similar knowledge present could help to direct their recovery. Wouldn't it have been wonderful if Kisenosato received proper medical attention and then had an expert guide his recovery? If that was the case, he possibly would still be Yokozuna Kisenosato instead of Araiso Oyakata.
  21. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    It the tendon is ruptured, surgery is the only treatment that could return the muscle to reasonably normal function. Takakeisho's tendon was not involved, so surgical treatment is not required. Kisenosato's tendon was ruptured yet for some reason, the injury was allowed to heal without surgical repair. Because proper treatment was avoided, the muscle was permanently weakened. Since he was a yokozuna, he could take as long as necessary to recuperate from surgery without any loss of rank. I have no idea (along with many others) why Kisensato's advisors and maybe Kisenosato himself made such a senseless and harmful decision.
  22. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Thanks for the photos. The previous one didn't show the full extent of his injuries, especiallly how badly his arm was bruised. Even so, the diagnosis remains muscle injury with no damage to the tendon. If there was, I doubt that he would have the mobility to raise his left arm to the same approximate level as his right. In addition, he would presently be recovering from surgery, not working out on a dohyo. As for being back in training, I'm sure it's very mild. Probably the only reason he's doing it is to remain somewhat active. I'm certain that if he did anything to make his situation even slightly worse, his medical advisors would put a stop to it.
  23. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    The muscle involved in Takakeisho's injury was prmarily the pectoralis major. There was no mention of bicep bruising. Proximal refers to being near the point of attachment. In this case, Dr. Google seems to be talking about bleeding caused by the rupture of a tendon where the muscle attaches to the bone. Since Takakeisho's injury was diagnosed as a tear in the belly of the muscle itself without the tendon being involved, the ecchymosis was due to that and not the much more serious injury of Kisenosato. If he had indeed torn the the tendon at the top of his pectoralis muscle, the progress report following the injury would not come from his comments as he returned to training (at least somewhat). It instead would have come from surgeons who operated on the injury. I agree that words on Google or the rest of the Internet for that matter can be confusing. In the phrase "proximal arm ecchymosis", only the word "ecchymosis" is correct in this case. There was a lot of internal bleeding, but the photo shows that most of it is in the lower chest area. There seems to be very little in the arm and areas where the tendon is located. Therefore, "proximal" really doesn't describe this injury. It can best be explained as being distal to (away from) the attachment. Hakuho and Takakeisho were both very fortunate that their injuries only involved torn muscle tissue, not the tendons attaching them. They avoided surgery which may not have been completely successful. Kisenosato was not so lucky. For some reason, no surgery was done to repair his torn tendon and he had absolutely no chance of recovery.
  24. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Because his treatment is much more conservative than Kisenosato's surgery would have been, Takakeisho would appear to me to have a better prognosis. He will return to action much sooner and should be in pretty good condition when he does. Surgery would have helped Kisenosato greatly, but I have no idea if his pectoral muscle would be as strong as it was before the tendon was torn.
  25. sekitori

    Takakeisho injury update

    Kisenosato's injury involved tearing the tendon attached to the shoulder.. Notice that most of Takakeisho's discoloration from bleeding (ecchymosis) is located in the lower part of the muscle. The area near the shoulder isn't nearly as discolored.That indicates that his injury involves the belly of the muscle, not the tendon. There is an enormous difference between the two injuries. His course of treatment, like Hakuho's bicep injury, is rest. I see nothing wrong with his resuming training as long as it is done under medical supervision and there is absolutely no strain placed on the injured area. This injury occurred about a week and a half ago. The pectorailis major is a large muscle and Takekeisho is a very large human being, so an injury involving it is expected to visibly look pretty bad after such a short period of time. Two things are certain. The first is that the medical advice he's receiving is quite sound, allowing time to heal the injury and having him do nothing which would aggravate it. The second is that this injury will take quite a while to heal and he will be kyujo for Kyushu--and possibly for Tokyo in January as well.