sekitori

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About sekitori

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  1. sekitori

    Hakuhou injured-Kyushu crisis looms

    The term for abstaining from food is called fasting. Since no food is entering one's body and nothing is being metabolized, should't that term be changed to "slowing" instead? This topic has deteriorated from a discussion about knee surgery to one referring to people's aging and to triple burgers with cole slaw on the side. My comment about the more proper term for not eating has obviously deteriorated this discussion even further to a point where it no longer can be saved. I believe it should be ended now. One more thing. The only proper side dish that goes with a triple burger (or a burger of any kind) is fries--well done, of course. If old people who live in Israel prefer cole slaw instead, they have a lot to learn about the art of burger eating.
  2. sekitori

    Hakuhou injured-Kyushu crisis looms

    In 2019, the Nagoya basho will begin on the first Sunday in July--July 7th. I've seen the 2020 schedule and ll also will begin on the first Sunday just as it did in 2019--July 5th. The basho will be over on July 19th and the Olympics will begin on Friday. July 24th. That way, there will be no conflict with the Olympics at all.
  3. sekitori

    Hakuhou injured-Kyushu crisis looms

    If anyone can afford to miss a basho or two, it would be Hakuho. If it takes even longer to return until he's fully healthy again, that should be of no concern. His goal is to be active for the Olympics in 2020 and if he has to sit out a few bashos before then, that's no problem. The fact that he could have a zensho yusho with a debilitating knee injury is amazing. He has 41 yushos, more makunouchi and yokozuna victories than anyone, and the most zensho-yushos. He has absolutely nothing more to prove. Like Kisenosato, Hakuho can go kyujo in future bashos without crtisicism, although Kisentosato had to begin competing again after such a long time away from sumo or face retirement. Hakuho on the other hand, has the luxury of planning his own future prior to his retirement. I believe there are eleven bashos remaining until the Olympics in 2020. If he cares to compete in some of them, tha's fine. If he chooses to go kyujo in others, that's okay, too. I enjoy watching him compete but if he goes kyujo in some upcoming bashos prior to the Olympics, I can understand his reasoning.for doing so.
  4. sekitori

    Wajima in memoriam overview

    Some friends who were interested in Japanese culture suggested that I watch a sumo digest show broadcast on a local Los Angeles channel. One day, I did and the very first rikishi I ever saw was Wajima. I was greatly impressed with his presence on the dohyo. Although I knew nothing about him, he looked like a champion. That particular match started the great appreciation of sumo I've had for many years. If someone asks me how I got interested in sumo, I say that it began with Wajima.
  5. sekitori

    Aurora breaks the record and Aki weigh-in

    Although it's easy to understand, many people have no idea of what "median" really is. "Average" or "mean" is much easier to comprehend although it may not explain a situation like Konishiki's as well as the use of "median". Still and all, the fact that someone's excessive weight could in some way mathematically affect the mean weight of others was rather interesting and that's why I used the term "average" in my post.
  6. sekitori

    Aurora breaks the record and Aki weigh-in

    When Konishiki retired, the average weight of makunouchi rikishis dropped by around 3 kg.
  7. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    Any yusho which includes 15 straight wins, no matter how how they were won, is zensho worthy. As I mentioned before, rank has its privileges. In sumo, those privileges especially apply to a rikishi who has won 41 yushos, has over 1000 makunouchi victories, and wants to extend his career to include his presence at the 2020 Olympics. Hakuho is now at a stage when he can choose which bashos in which to compete and which to go kyujo. No mattter what his reason may be for going kyujo in any particular basho, I doubt if anyone will complain. He is now at a point where he can do just about anything he wants to. I doubt if that can be said about any other rikishi who ever competed.
  8. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    I doubt very much if Hakuho intends face slapping in and of itself to be anything more than a distraction. Face slapping followed by the elbow smash is however, a deadly combination. If you want to see a harite that alone caused real damage, watch this video of the way Kyokudozan used it against Kushimaumi. It knocked Kusihimaumi senseless.
  9. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    He can overcome unfavorable situations that other rikishis are unable to avoid. Asashoryu was very similar. An example is an almost certain okurdashi loss they both were facing, managing to somehow change their position, and then winning the match. Asashoryu did it against.Wakanosato. Hakuho did it against Takakeisho in this basho and in the past, I believe against Takarafuji as well. This talent is called "ring sense". I believe the term originated with boxing and refers to a competitor's instinctive sense of timing and distance. Both Hakuho and Asashoryu displayed it better than any other rikishi I've ever seen. And if one of Hakuho's "games" backfires causing him to lose a yusho, he can take great comfort in the fact that he already has won 40 of them--and may add even more before he's finished.
  10. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    Instead of stating that both yokozinas are undefeated, I intended my words to mean that both of the yokozunas who had a reasonable chance to win the yusho were undefeated. As was stated previously, I did mention the "other" yokozuna, but my statement should have been clearer. Sorry for causing people to be upset by what they believe is my "odd" use of language.
  11. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    I don't think it's wacky at all. I happen to like the way it's evolving. Hakuho achieved his milestone 800th win as a yokozua. Both yokozunas are undefeated and two of the ozekis have only one loss. The other yokozuna and ozeki are injured and are doing their best to get winning records. Mitakeumi is still in line for promotion to ozeki, at least so far. Hokutofuji and Ryuden are doing unexpectedly well at 7-1. After having a terrible 2-13 basho, Yoshikaze is now at 6-2. Asanoyama is also at 6-2. Aminiishiki has a good chance of returning to makunouchi and Toyonoshima, after a horrendous injury, will finally return to juryo. What's not to like?
  12. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    There are a couple of difficulties with that statement. Yutakayama is was injured and sat out a few days. How healthy and fit he will be on his first day back is questionable. The second problem is that Hakuho had 792 wins as a yokozuna at the start of the Aki basho. Since he is now 7-0, his next victory will be number 800, a sumo milestone. The rikishi attempting to keep him from that goal is Yutakayama. When he competes in an extremly notable bout in his career, Hakuho becomes highly motivated. And when the greatest yokouna of all has in addiition to his great talent, that kind of motivation, I don't think it's a good idea to bet against him.
  13. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    According to Wikipedia, whose information may or may not be correct, he weighed 216 lb. (98 kg.). Another source stated a similar weight, around 213 lb. I remember that he was always mentioned as weighing very close to 100 kg. during his makuuchi career, so those figures sound fairly accurate.
  14. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    I think if he has eight wins, considering the length of time he's been away, that will probably be good enough to keep him around for another basho. 8-7 is far from being a yokozuna-like record, but it's a winning one. If however, he doesn't get at least 9-6 in the following basho, that will be an entirely different story. I admire Kisenosato for continuing to compete with a severely debilitating injury that was not treated properly. Many rikishis, even those in the highest ranks, would have retired instead of spending an enormous amount of time and effort to remain in sumo. I wish him the best.
  15. sekitori

    Aki Basho 2018 Discussion [SPOILERS]

    It's almost certain that no rikishi is ever 100% healthy. In an activity where the object is to knock a strong, heavy person to the dirt or out of the ring, having an injury of some sort is virtually inevitable.