Asashosakari

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Everything posted by Asashosakari

  1. Asashosakari

    How many komusubi did you go for? (Nagoya GTB)

    Of course it does, since players who created additional sekiwake almost certainly would have created further additional komusubi otherwise. Anyway, disregarding the 6 players who had the wrong number of ozeki: 4 lower sanyaku: 41 players 5 lower sanyaku: 43 players (2S+3K: 26, 3S+2K: 17) 6 lower sanyaku: 10 players (2S+4K: 7, 3S+3K: 2, 4S+2K: 1) The 4 players who didn't promote Takakeisho to ozeki (= 1 excess lower sanyaku) had 4+2 (twice) and 3+3 (twice), the 2 players who didn't demote Tochinoshin (= 1 too few lower sanyaku) had 2+2 and 2+3. (There was also a player who inexplicably demoted Takayasu and promoted Mitakeumi, but at least their ozeki count was correct that way... They're included among the 94 players of the main summary.)
  2. Asashosakari

    How many komusubi did you go for? (Nagoya GTB)

    That basho also had plenty of people going for more than two sekiwake, though, so not like the komusubi counts alone are all that meaningful.
  3. I can't find it anymore now, but a year or two back I came across a scholarly article by a Japanese employment expert (can't remember if lawyer or academic) that put the sanyo system into the context of Japan-wide efforts to retain older, experienced members of the work force for longer to deal with the effects of the country's aging society, and suggested that the Kyokai's approach could serve as a model to other Japanese businesses who are still on the fence about instituting such measures. That author certainly appeared to consider it to be a general employment extension system, not just one for exceptional contributors.
  4. Asashosakari

    Invite for GTB- July (Nagoya) 2022- 155 entries - RESULTS!!

    I had Chiyomaru in front of both J6's initially, but that just seemed so odd in relation to where Hidenoumi will go if he's not promoted. Of course, that kind of thing has never stopped them before, so I fully expect to have wasted 5 points there at the last moment.
  5. Asashosakari

    Invite for GTB- July (Nagoya) 2022- 155 entries - RESULTS!!

    Terunofuji (Ye 12-3 Y) Y --- Takakeisho (O2w 8-7) O1 Mitakeumi (O1e 6-9) --- O2 Shodai (O1w 5-10) Wakatakakage (Se 9-6) S Daieisho (Kw 11-4) Hoshoryu (Ke 8-7) K Abi (Sw 7-8) Kiribayama (M2e 10-5) M1 Ichinojo (M1w kosho) Kotonowaka (M2w 9-6) M2 Takanosho (M4w 11-4) Tamawashi (M3w 9-6) M3 Takayasu (M1e 6-9) Ura (M6e 9-5-1) M4 Wakamotoharu (M6w 9-6) Endo (M4e 7-8) M5 Sadanoumi (M12w 11-4) Aoiyama (M11e 10-5) M6 Tobizaru (M5w 7-8) Okinoumi (M10e 9-6) M7 Hokutofuji (M3e 5-10) Tochinoshin (M9w 8-7) M8 Shimanoumi (M8e 7-8) Nishikigi (M10w 8-7) M9 Kotoeko (M7w 6-9) Chiyotairyu (M13e 8-7) M10 Meisei (M13w 8-7) Kotoshoho (M9e 6-9) M11 Midorifuji (M16w 9-6) Terutsuyoshi (M8w 5-10) M12 Takarafuji (M7e 4-11) Ichiyamamoto (M15w 8-7) M13 Chiyoshoma (M11w 6-9) Myogiryu (M12e 6-9) M14 Onosho (M5e 2-4-9) Tsurugisho (J2w 10-5) M15 Oho (M14e 6-9) Yutakayama (M14w 6-9) M16 Daiamami (J6e 11-4 D) Nishikifuji (J6w 11-4 Y) M17 Chiyomaru (J1e 8-7)
  6. Asashosakari

    Sumo Reference Updates

    It happened again. Starring: Aratama (pre-modern makushita rikishi without a DB entry) Tomohibiki (pre-modern makushita rikishi with a placeholder entry due to kabu relevance) [ja.wiki] Kiyosegawa Shikishima (not the one who's currently an oyakata) and the Tateyama, Isegahama and Kumagatani shares along with affiliated stables. [Relevant ja.wiki links: T-kabu, T-beya, K-kabu, K-beya] The culprit this time was an attempt to figure out when the old (pre-Asahifuji) Isegahama-beya was actually founded. Here's how it apparently went (issues of interest for the DB marked as such): Tomohibiki was a not overly successful rikishi, but one married to his shisho Tomozuna's niece and thus with an "in" towards a future oyakata career. Already 31 years old, for the February 1911 tournament he was promoted to makushita for the first and, it turned out, last time, as he promptly retired from the dohyo having fulfilled that era's kabu eligibility criterion. (Current DB status: His kabu starting date is given only vaguely as "after 1909" instead of 1911.02.) He became Tateyama-oyakata, taking on a share that had been vacant for a couple of years after the death of the previous holder, another former Tomozuna rikishi (who isn't relevant here). Elsewhere, Kumagatani-beya had been in existence for a while, created by Aratama sometime after 1890, achieving a moderate level of success. In January 1921, ex-Aratama gave up his oyakata status due to old age, the stable being handed over to a successor. This turned out to be Shikishima, a former maegashira also of Tomozuna, 33 years old and freshly fallen to makushita. (Current DB status: Shikishima is correctly listed as having become Kumagatani in 1921.01, but not as a heya successor. Instead via an undated later branch-out that doesn't appear to be real, presumably listed that way because we just had no pre-1927 heya data to know what actually happened there.) In any case, this was not a universally agreed-upon succession, as ja.wiki alludes to a dispute with the stable's sole active makuuchi rikishi Kiyosegawa who also hoped to take over. Snubbed, Kiyosegawa (with uchideshi in tow) left for....Tateyama-beya, apparently created at this time solely for that purpose; ja.wiki makes it clear that ex-Tomohibiki was a mere figurehead shisho with Kiyosegawa really calling the shots. (Current DB status: The Tateyama branchout is dated only vaguely to "before 1927". I'm not sure what will be a good, more accurate date to put. Maybe 1921.05, the month of the next basho? Ja.wiki doesn't actually say that Kiyosegawa left Kumagatani immediately after the dispute, but it stands to reason, given the general history of similar situations.) To now answer the Isegahama-beya question - Kiyosegawa remained active as a rikishi for quite a while longer afterwards, finally retiring in 1929 at age 35. He became Isegahama-oyakata and took over the running of "his" Tateyama-beya shortly after, renaming it to Isegahama-beya in the process. So the heya carried that name since 1930 as already reflected on the DB, but its history went back to 1921. Ex-Tomohibiki stayed affiliated to the stable until his retirement nearly 30 years later. (By which time the heya had been renamed again to Araiso-beya, after it was passed on in 1953 to freshly retired yokozuna Terukuni who was using that oyakata name. It became Isegahama-beya a second time in 1961 when Kiyosegawa was one of several oyakata hit by the newly instituted age 65 retirement rule, and the share became free for ex-Terukuni to use.) -------------------------------------- While looking into the players involved here, I came across an older post of mine in this thread. The change requests therein apparently slipped through unnoticed until now:
  7. Asashosakari

    Stable and Ichimon Dominance

    Which brings up the aspect that most fans probably don't think of juryo rikishi contributing much to a stable's "dominance", so I'm not sure if a count of sekitori is really the best measure to begin with. FWIW... Highest shares of makuuchi rikishi since 1958 (only each heya's top entry, after a fashion): Futagoyama 10 of 40 (25%) in 1993.03 and 1993.05 [immediately following the Fujishima (6) / Futagoyama (4) merger] Tokitsukaze 10 of 49 (20.4%) in 1959.03 Tatsunami 8 of 40 (20%) in 1965.01 Takasago 10 of 54 (18.5%) in 1958.07 Dewanoumi 7 of 40 (17.5%) in 1964.07, 1965.03, 1965.05, 1966.05, 1966.09 and 1967.01 [absolute top: 8 of 54 (14.8%) in 1958.03] Sadogatake 7 of 40 (17.5%) in 1992.11 and 1993.01 Musashigawa 7 of 40 (17.5%) in 2003.09 Futagoyama pre-merger 6 of 35 (17.1%) in 1981.11 Hanakago 7 of 41 (17.1%) in 1961.09, 1961.11 and 1962.01 Izutsu 6 of 38 (15.8%) in 1989.03 Fujishima pre-merger 6 of 40 (15%) in 1991.11, 1992.03, 1992.05, 1992.07, 1992.09, 1992.11 and 1993.01 Mihogaseki 5 of 35 (14.3%) in 1981.01 Kasugano 5 of 38 (13.2%) in 1984.01 Sakaigawa 5 of 42 (11.9%) in 2012.03, 2012.07, 2014.09, 2015.01, 2015.03, 2015.05, 2015.07, 2015.11 and 2016.07 Isegahama [2007- version] 5 of 42 (11.9%) in 2014.11, 2015.01, 2015.03, 2015.05, 2015.07, 2015.09, 2015.11 and 2016.01 Kokonoe 5 of 42 (11.9%) in 2017.01, 2021.07 and 2021.09 Oitekaze 5 of 42 (11.9%) in 2019.11, 2021.03, 2021.05 and 2021.07 Miyagino 4 of 34 (11.8%) in 1967.07, 1967.09, 1967.11 and 1968.01 Isegahama [1921-2007 version] 4 of 34 (11.8%) in 1970.07 Asahiyama 4 of 34 (11.8%) in 1972.05 Nishonoseki 4 of 36 (11.1%) in 1974.09, 1974.11, 1975.01 and 1975.09 Oshima 4 of 38 (10.5%) in 1990.07 Naruto 4 of 42 (9.5%) in 2004.11, 2011.09, 2012.03, 2012.07 and 2012.09 Kise 4 of 42 (9.5%) in 2016.03, 2021.07 and 2021.09 ... Araiso 4 of 55 (7.3%) in 1958.01 (I left out some stables that topped out at 3 makuuchi rikishi, but with percentages between Kise and Araiso. The list is complete for 4+.) Edit: Scrap Araiso, I forgot that that's the same as the old Isegahama.
  8. Asashosakari

    2022 World Games

    I wonder if it's a specific sumo issue or one affecting other World Games sports as well. Skimming the regulations of the relevant visa classification, I'd say that a narrow reading of the requirements would cause most athletes in purely amateur sports to fail.
  9. Asashosakari

    New seating at the KKan

    Yeah, that's 400k yen per day currently for the block of seats that are going to be converted, not the price afterwards. Or at least that's how Nikkan calculated it, which seems a bit high to me. On top of that, the 20m yen price tag for the whole 45 days seems to be entirely their speculation, not anything the Kyokai has suggested.
  10. Asashosakari

    Ajigawa beya?

    Considering the sanyo system now already exists unchanged for about as long as the jun-toshitori system did altogether through two iterations, I daresay they're probably fine with how it's working.
  11. Asashosakari

    Measuring Ōzeki Quality

    I didn't say the pre-1969 ozeki were any better, I said that the circumstances of the time made it more palatable to expect them to be better. There were routine public complaints about both the yokozuna and the ozeki in the post-war period, usually alleging that politicking was leading to unqualified rikishi being promoted to the ranks (or conversely, qualified candidates being refused), which first led to the creation of the YDC and then more gradually to the development of today's relatively tough ozeki promotion standards as the authorities came to grips with the expanded annual schedule of tournaments. Also, a one-size-fits-all comparison purely of win-loss records and averages doesn't address the main issue, namely that the opponent schedules weren't uniformly easier, but rather (comparable to the Futagoyama effect in the 1990s) in very uneven fashion from one yokozuna/ozeki to the next.
  12. Asashosakari

    Measuring Ōzeki Quality

    Let's keep in mind that "kunroku", by its very nature as a word denoting "9-6", is a relatively modern invention since it obviously came into being in the 15-bout era only. As I've had reason to mention a couple of times recently, the first decade and a half of those tournaments - ignoring the brief prior period in Futabayama's heyday which had its own issues - from 1949 to 1964 had significantly more restrictive match-making rules which resulted in many high-rankers of the day getting a much easier ride than high-rankers did after 1965, and even moreso than they do nowadays where almost no heya manages to put more than two rikishi into the joi concurrently anymore and the joi competition is very close to the ideal top 16 roundrobin (injuries aside). I'm probably a broken record on this point - especially over on Reddit which is the unofficial headquarters of "all ozeki suck" sentiment - but I would contend that the reason a great number of ozeki don't actually hit 10+ wins all that often isn't that they're bad or that too many unqualified rikishi are getting promoted to the rank, it's that the double-digit expectation is 50+ years out of date, and arguably only survives because "double digits" is such an easily digested notion that people (the Kyokai brass quite possibly included) don't bother to question its meaning. It was appropriate to denigrate 8/9 wins as unsatisfactory when top-rankers were facing some selection of 15 rikishi out of the top 20 to 25, but it just doesn't match the historical evidence of what high-caliber rikishi are actually capable of achieving when the schedule is closer to the ideal top 16. Unless people want to make the ozeki rank into a more exclusive thing than yokozuna, it's high time for it to be acknowledged that 9 wins is a perfectly acceptable result for an ozeki, both in an individual basho as well as in their career average at the rank.
  13. Asashosakari

    Banzuke "BS"

    Oh, one more thing: I'm actually not sure what the physical besseki ranking looked like. Gans-san's site lists them in two columns.
  14. Asashosakari

    Banzuke "BS"

    On a side-note, the match schedules the returning rikishi were given broadly corresponded to their pre-departure ranks even though those weren't acknowledged on the separate besseki ranking. Ayazakura, who left as a komusubi, had joi-type matchups, while Sotogahama, who left as M16, mostly faced low-ranked maegashira.
  15. Asashosakari

    More Takatoriki nonsense.

    I suspect that issue is self-resolving because non-prospects rarely, if ever, have their career hopes asked and reported. Occasionally we read of a shisho saying he hopes to get [random recruit] to makushita in X years, obviously not meaning to imply that he already thinks the kid isn't good for anything more, but that sekitoridom won't be a sure thing. Inasmuch as recruits themselves are mentioning goals less than juryo at all, it's usually something ambitious anyway (like a middle school grad wanting to be there in two years) and presented as just a stepping stone.
  16. Asashosakari

    Sumo Reference Updates

    The DB has Shoketsu's real given name as Katsuaki, but the Kyokai has the reading Yoshiaki. Confirmed (of sorts) by the handle of his Twitter account. Are there independent sources for the Katsuaki reading in his first four shikona?
  17. Asashosakari

    Sumo Reference Updates

    Yes, the DB doesn't count tournaments ranked-but-already-intai towards the career summaries. For a multitude of further cases, see the many yaocho retirements prior to May 2011.
  18. Asashosakari

    More Takatoriki nonsense.

    It's all very fickle altogether, not only when it involves rikishi like Hoshoryu and Oho who have the added baggage of high-profile ancestors. When Oho was stuck in high makushita for a bit people were suddenly all about started-one-year-later Roga even though he'd not actually shown anything better yet either, then both hype trains reversed course again nearly overnight after Oho did break through to juryo and Roga didn't (and hasn't, to date). I'm not even sure I'd call that overrating/underrating them, because that implies there's an actual thought process behind it. It's mostly just people mindlessly following the herd.
  19. Asashosakari

    Ex-Kaounishiki finds a new job in sumo

    Looking good in the picture Chunichi used to illustrate their article: Also, easy to forget that he wasn't exactly a sumo lifer despite staying until his 40s; he's a Toyo University alum.
  20. Asashosakari

    Ex-Kaounishiki finds a new job in sumo

    Man, that scared me for a moment - other sports forums I've been on tend to bring morbid news when a thread features nothing but an ex-athlete's name in the title... Glad to find it's something rather more prosperous in nature. Nice to see Kaonishiki get the opportunity. In any case, I suspect Tagonoura-oyakata can use the help. 15 rikishi is on the high side for a heya with no affiliated oyakata (since ex-Kise left, anyway), and of course Tagonoura has had his issues both health and otherwise in the not so distant past.
  21. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Natsu 2022

    Scores for banzuke purposes: chishafuwaku 10 (9+Top) Athenayama 9 (8+TB) Sakura 8 Rocks 8 (7+TB) WAKATAKE 7 Asashosakari 7 (6+TB) Chartorenji 6 Hakuryuho 6 Mmikasazuma 5 Profomisakari 5 Yarimotsu 3 Total: 74 / 11 = 6.73 ---> +1 win An obvious split to the field this time around. The new banzuke for Nagoya 2022: Asashosakari (Ye 8-7) Y chishafuwaku (Oe 11-4 Y) Tsuchinoninjin (Ow kosho) O Athenayama (Se 10-5 J) Sakura (Sw 9-6) S Rocks (Kw 9-6) ryafuji (Ke kosho) K WAKATAKE (M3e 8-7) Chartorenji (M1e 7-8) M1 Holleshoryu (M1w kosho) Tameiki (M2e kosho) M2 Hakuryuho (M2w 7-8) Profomisakari (M3w 6-9) M3 Mmikasazuma (NR 6-9) Yarimotsu (M4e 4-11) M4 Jejima (M4w kosho) Two yusho on the trot? As ozeki? Yeah, that just happened. Congratulations to chishafuwaku on joining the LKS pantheon as the game's fourth yokozuna in its 13-year history, and in fact just the second one after Jejima to get promoted the classical way. (Asashosakari and Mmikasazuma did it with promotion-worthy scores across three tournaments.) Best of luck in continuing to represent yourself well as one of the game's best players! This concludes chishafuwaku's time as ozeki after 21 tournaments at the rank, comprising a short four-tournament run back in 2017 and a much longer one since May 2019 which was briefly interrupted for a one-basho demotion with immediate bounceback in September last year. Tsuchinoninjin was absent from his second tournament at the ozeki rank after a successful debut back in March, and it's hoped we see him back in action next time. The spot alongside him at the second-highest rank has been (re)taken by a familiar face - since his demotion from ozeki after the last Kyushu tournament, Athenayama has quickly proven himself worthy of another stint, with a shared 3rd-4th place result in January, shared 2nd-3rd in March, and now a solo 2nd place. Congrats!
  22. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Natsu 2022

    (Haru results going up shortly, but I figure this has a bit more urgency.) The lineup for Natsu 2022, without Terunofuji for the first time in three years: 1. Mitakeumi 8 [score?] 2. Abi 7 [score?] 3. Kamito 6 4. Ryuo 6 5. Kitanowaka 5 6. Kiryuko 5* 7. Nobehara 5* 8. Miyagi 5* 9. Wakatakakage 4 [score?] 10. Wakamotoharu 4 11. Kotoshoho 4 12. Nishikigi 4 13. Shimazuumi 4 TB: [pick?] (* marks rikishi with no makekoshi since debut) The scoring and thus your game assignment: For sanyaku: Please predict an exact record for each rikishi. The target record will be calculated after the deadline and will be chosen so that it bisects the predictions as evenly as possible. The predictions will then be converted into + and - votes as usual; one point for each correct prediction. For lower-ranked rikishi: Please predict for each rikishi if he will finish KK or MK; one point for each correct prediction. (For clarification: If you're expecting an outright makekoshi for one of the sanyaku high-rankers, just predict MK, exact records are only needed on the kachikoshi side of things.) First tie-breaker: From among those 13 guys up there and the further 9 rikishi (8 'veterans' and Covid-extended newcomer Mukainakano) who are currently just shy of a 5-KK streak, please guess how many KK you expect in total. Your tie-breaker guess may be anything from 0 to 22. Only exactly correct guesses qualify at this tie-breaker stage. Note: Sanyaku count as correct for the tie-breaker if they achieve KK, they do not need to meet their target records. Next 12 tie-breakers if needed: Correctly predicted rikishi, one-by-one in ballot order, i.e. starting at Mitakeumi. Extra tie-breakers, should two or more players have entered identical ballots: Proximity of their tie-breaker guesses to the correct number, followed by proximity of their sanyaku rikishi guesses to the correct records (one-by-one in ballot order). Final tie-breaker: earliest entry. Note: Rikishi who show up on the before-shonichi kyujo list will be excluded from scoring (even if they end up joining the basho later), so it is not necessary to re-submit your entry if you picked such a rikishi as a KK; he will not count for points anyhow. You may, however, notify me if you'd like to reduce your tie-breaker guess by one point to compensate for the "missing" rikishi. Your position on the entry list (for final tie-breaker purposes) will be deemed unchanged in this special situation. Any other changes to a ballot will be considered a new entry, with correspondingly lower priority for the final tie-breaker. Deadline: Shonichi noon JST. ----- Simplified entry template: 1. Mitakeumi W-L 2. Abi W-L 3. Kamito KKMK 4. Ryuo KKMK 5. Kitanowaka KKMK 6. Kiryuko KKMK 7. Nobehara KKMK 8. Miyagi KKMK 9. Wakatakakage W-L 10. Wakamotoharu KKMK 11. Kotoshoho KKMK 12. Nishikigi KKMK 13. Shimazuumi KKMK TB xx ----- Good luck!
  23. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Natsu 2022

    Day 15 Reaching the end of LKS Natsu, we lost another two rikishi from the ballot: Abi was defeated in the sekiwake duel to finish 7-8, and Shimazuumi lost against yusho contender Daiamami in juryo. On the bright side we retained Nishikigi who collected his last-minute KK against Chiyotairyu. The final standings: Day 15: 13/13 Decisions, TB 11 Pos Player Pts TB 1 chishafuwaku 9 12 2 Athenayama 8 11 3 Sakura 8 15 4 Rocks 7 11 5 WAKATAKE 7 12 6 Asashosakari 6 11 7 Chartorenji 6 13 7 Hakuryuho 6 14 9 Mmikasazuma 5 13 9 Profomisakari 5 13 11 Yarimotsu 3 13 I had to look twice, because these results seemed oddly familiar. In fact the top three places are taken by the same players as in Haru basho, back then with Athenayama and Sakura sharing the runner-up spot. You may be seeing what I'm getting at - yes, chishafuwaku has won back-to-back tournaments, the first player to do so since Mmikasazuma back in Hatsu and Haru 2018. It is his fourth title overall. Athenayama takes the sole jun-yusho spot of the tournament, breaking away from Sakura courtesy of the correct tie-breaker choice. Two other players also benefit from having picked the right number of on- and off-ballot kachikoshi. The new ballot for Nagoya 2022: Mitakeumi 8 Abi 7 1. Kamito 7 2. Ryuo 7 Kitanowaka 5 3. Nobehara 6* 4. Kiryuko 6* Miyagi 5* 5. Wakatakakage 5 6. Wakamotoharu 5 Kotoshoho 4 7. Nishikigi 5 Shimazuumi 4 8. Chiyosakae 5 9. Kainoshima 5 10. Suzuki 5 11. Mukainakano 5* --- 12. Ryuden 4 13. Tochimaru 4 Only Wakatakakage remains in the game as a sanyaku-ranked rikishi now, and the next ballot will be headed by Kamito, the first time since Kyushu 2019 that the top spot isn't held down by a sekitori. On the upside, that's an interesting pair of 4-KK sekitori additions with Ryuden still on the way back to his old mid-maegashira stomping grounds (or is he?), and Natsu juryo newcomer Tochimaru trying to prove that his debut KK wasn't a fluke.
  24. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Natsu 2022

    Day 14 And just like that, eight yusho hopefuls turned into one. Kamito clinched his 7th straight winning record up in the makushita promotion zone, which served to eliminate Asashosakari and Athenayama from the race. Kotoshoho then fell to a very much unexpected MK in the maegashira ranks, after which Chartorenji, Mmikasazuma, Rocks and Sakura were contenders no more. And finally sekiwake Abi dropped to 7-7 and away from his 9-win target, cutting off the path for WAKATAKE. The last man standing, regardless of the final two outcomes for Nishikigi and Shimazuumi: chishafuwaku! More on his victory in the senshuraku round-up. While Abi was left with his KK/MK decision still open, the penultimate day did see things conclude for the other two sanyaku-rankers: Seven days after missing his target, ozeki Mitakeumi found himself outright makekoshi and at the end of his 8-KK streak. Sekiwake Wakatakakage, however, grabbed his 8th win to remain on the LKS ballot for the next tournament. Day 14: 11/13 Decisions, TB 10-13 Pos Player Pts TB 1 chishafuwaku 8 12 2 Athenayama 7 11 3 Rocks 6 11 4 Sakura 6 15 5 Asashosakari 5 11 5 WAKATAKE 5 12 7 Chartorenji 5 13 8 Hakuryuho 5 14 9 Mmikasazuma 4 13 10 Profomisakari 3 13 11 Yarimotsu 2 13 Those closest to chishafuwaku no longer had enough different picks to close the gap again: Athenayama and Rocks shared the leader's selections altogether, while Sakura had just one slot to score with.
  25. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Natsu 2022

    Day 13 Entering the basho home stretch with three new results. Wakamotoharu continues his ascent from upper juryo to upper makuuchi regular, freshly renamed mostly-sandanme veteran Ryuo (Tatsukaze until last basho) posts his 7th straight kachikoshi, and collegiate rookie Miyagi reaches the end of his debut KK streak. All of these results defied the majority predictions, Miyagi's even left egg on our faces unanimously. Honma also finished things up, but with his last minute MK he won't be joining the Nagoya ballot. Day 13: 8/13 Decisions, TB 8-15 Pos Player Pts TB 1 Athenayama 5 11 1 chishafuwaku 5 12 1 Rocks 5 11 4 Asashosakari 4 11 4 WAKATAKE 4 12 6 Chartorenji 4 13 6 Mmikasazuma 4 13 8 Sakura 4 15 9 Profomisakari 3 13 10 Hakuryuho 3 14 11 Yarimotsu 2 13 Fully eight players - everybody on 4+ points - still had a theoretical chance to win the yusho at this point, albeit with vastly different likelihoods. (Asashosakari even needed an assist by the torikumi committee, in that victory was only possible if Wakatakakage and Abi would not face each other on senshuraku...)