Asashosakari

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Everything posted by Asashosakari

  1. Asashosakari

    Sumo and the Olympics

    And now to see if the NSK moves the honbasho out of the way, as they had done with Nagoya 2020. The 2021 edition is currently scheduled to end on the 25th.
  2. Asashosakari

    User settings change

    Doesn't your old phone's browser have some sort of section in its settings where all stored passwords can be looked up?
  3. Asashosakari

    New ozeki Asanoyama

    Before clicking the link I was all "wait, what?"...
  4. Asashosakari

    Latest news regarding kabu, Oyakata transfers, etc.

    One strange case I just ran into while googling around is that of later ozeki Shimizugawa - Wikipedia says that he got romantically involved with a woman whose brother was a yakuza member, and subsequently got threatened by said brother which resulted in him missing several tournaments in 1927 and eventually getting thrown out by his shisho. The Wiki article doesn't go into further detail about what exactly went on except to say that he ended up travelling all over the country and even to Manchuria, but I'm guessing it means he eloped with the woman to get away from her brother for a while. He was eventually re-admitted into sumo.
  5. Asashosakari

    Latest news regarding kabu, Oyakata transfers, etc.

    Tamanoumi was also the one that came to my mind first, and may well be the most recent one pre-Sokokurai. (Edit: Okay, decidedly not the most recent, see Yubinhaad's post below.) Prior to him: WWII time definitely covers several more, even two later yokozuna (Yoshibayama, Tochinishiki), and then there are also the rikishi who returned from Tenryu's breakaway organization in the early 1930s, many of whom later became oyakata. (Feel free to check those ranked as BS - besseki - in 1933.01, although that covers only most of the returners, not all.) Small nitpick: "Reintegration" doesn't really fit for the Osaka merger guys; while there were some rikishi who had moved from Tokyo to Osaka individually, the organization as a whole wasn't a breakaway, just one that had developed in parallel to Tokyo's. Yup.
  6. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    Finishing things up here for the ex-sekitori as well... new KK: Kaisho, Kizenryu, Dairaido new MK: Nionoumi, Keitenkai The final results: Record Rank Shikona Heya Age Out HiRk M# J# kyujo (i) Ms1e Sokokurai Arashio 36 1 M2 25 20 3-4 Ms1w Sakigake Shibatayama 33 1 J10 6 2-5 Ms2e Toyonoshima Tokitsukaze 36 1 S 71 11 6-1 Ms3e Asabenkei Takasago 31 11 J7 7 5-2 Ms3w Fujiazuma Tamanoi 32 18 M4 17 18 5-2 Ms4e Chiyonoo Kokonoe 28 8 M15 2 31 1-6 Ms4w Daiseido Kise 27 6 J12 3 kyujo Ms5w Gokushindo Nishikido 23 8 J13 1 3-4 Ms6w Toyohibiki Sakaigawa 35 13 M2 52 14 0-2-5 Ms7w Irodori Shikoroyama 28 1 J11 4 4-3 Ms9e Kaisho Asakayama 25 2 J11 2 4-3 Ms9w Chiyoarashi Kokonoe 28 40 J10 4 3-4 Ms10e Chiyonokuni Kokonoe 29 5 M1 25 16 5-2 Ms11e Jokoryu Kise 31 7 K 15 13 4-3 Ms11w Kizenryu Kise 34 10 J11 9 5-2 Ms13w Ryuko Onoe 21 4 J12 1 kyujo Ms16w Seiro Shikoroyama 31 3 M14 3 31 6-1 Ms19e Kitaharima Yamahibiki 33 15 M15 1 24 3-4 Ms24w Nionoumi Yamahibiki 33 40 M16 1 12 1-6 Ms31e Sagatsukasa Irumagawa 38 36 M9 6 22 4-3 Ms31w Kagamio Kagamiyama 32 23 M9 7 14 4-3 Ms38w Asahisho Tomozuna 30 17 M11 4 30 3-1-3 Ms39w Keitenkai Onomatsu 30 45 J11 1 3-4 Ms42e Takaryu Kise 27 28 J13 1 kyujo Ms44w Gagamaru Kise 33 2 K 36 23 5-2 Ms45w Ichiyamamoto Nishonoseki 26 2 J6 3 4-3 Ms46w Amakaze Oguruma 28 12 M13 1 18 3-4 Ms47e Tokushinho Kise 35 26 J6 27 3-4 Ms48e Higonojo Kise 35 35 J9 4 7-0 Y Sd30w Ura Kise 27 13 M4 5 6 2-5 Sd33e Kaonishiki Azumazeki 41 51 J6 2 5-2 Sd45w Masunoyama Chiganoura 29 30 M4 13 12 3-4 Sd57w Yoshiazuma Tamanoi 42 33 M12 3 18 4-3 Sd96e Dairaido Takadagawa 39 81 J2 6 kyujo Jd28w Hitenryu Tatsunami 35 51 J13 2 Chiyonokuni with his third straight 3-4 since winning the makushita yusho from a low rank last September; not looking that likely now that he'll be returning to sekitoridom. Jokoryu with his third consecutive score of at least 5-2, on the other hand, not sure that was to be expected after his year-long drop from low juryo to low makushita prior to this. Yeah, looks that way, lots of KK from sandanme to accommodate with makushita spots, so his Ms31e 1-6 result is unlikely to hang on. Much the same thing for Tokushinho and Higonojo as well, who spent only the briefest of times in sandanme over a decade ago after they turned professional out of university, and will probably be headed down there now.
  7. Day 8 (results, text-only results) 8-0 Ye Hakuho 7-1 M9e Takanosho, M13w Aoiyama 6-2 Yw Kakuryu, Se Asanoyama, M3w Mitakeumi, M11e Chiyotairyu, M12e Ishiura, M18e Kotonowaka If it wasn't for the unavoidable lack of a crowd and the woeful shortage of ozeki, this basho could almost be mistaken for one of the good old days. Hakuho in the lead, Kakuryu doing decently but unspectacularly, and the rest of the joi a mishmash of good, bad and ugly. Of course, the chasing pair of Takanosho and Aoiyama looks very much like the usual for the last couple of years. In any case, if he can avoid injuring himself during week two, this one certainly is Hakuho's to lose. The shape of Asanoyama's ozeki run depends on what you believe he needs to do to complete it successfully - if it's the by-the-numbers 12-3, then today's loss to Yutakayama was a rather inopportune development, if it's just 11-4 or even 10-5 he still has some room to spare. The non-yokozuna frontrunner was Mitakeumi until two days ago, but back to back decisive losses to the yokozuna duo have already taken the shine off of it. Will he be able to avoid spiralling into a longer losing streak for once? 8-0 Hakuho Y Kakuryu 6-2 5-3 Takakeisho O --- 6-2 Asanoyama S Shodai 4-4 2-6 Hokutofuji K Endo 4-4 5-3 Daieisho M1 Takayasu 0-5-3 (x) 4-4 Okinoumi M2 Tokushoryu 1-7 3-5 Yutakayama M3 Mitakeumi 6-2 3-5 Enho M4 Abi 4-4 4-4 Ryuden M5 Onosho 5-3 M6 Kagayaki 5-3 5-3 Takarafuji M7 M8 Kiribayama 4-4 7-1 Takanosho M9 M10 6-2 Chiyotairyu M11 6-2 Ishiura M12 M13 Aoiyama 7-1 I sure hope that Takayasu is ranked high enough that he won't have to worry about getting demoted to juryo, although that may only be a small consolation with the way his career unfortunately seems to be falling apart on him right now. In actual demotion news we should be able to focus on the very lowest ranks soon; only one rikishi above M14 currently requires more than one additional win to retain his top division slot. The sole exception is winless Tochiozan, having quite a nightmare of a tournament so far and competing far worse than he did two months ago. (Although it has to be said that his performance there was rather surprising given his year-long decline that preceded it.) Tsurugisho started the basho looking much like he used to do for all the years he was mired in mid-juryo, i.e. heavily taped up, and his Day 5 withdrawal has likely all but assured that he's going to be the first demotee. Defending champion Terunofuji is your #1 candidate for promotion from juryo at the moment, although it hasn't escaped notice that he appears to be rather far from top physical condition again. I imagine he'll hold things together enough to clinch the makuuchi return though. Ever streaky Kotoeko is the other main contender for now, riding a 7-day winning run. (1) 1-7 Myogiryu M6 M7 Tamawashi 2-6 (1) (1) 2-6 Shohozan M8 M9 Tochinoshin 3-5 (1) (1) 3-5 Sadanoumi M10 Tochiozan 0-8 (4) M11 Terutsuyoshi 4-4 (1) M12 (1) 4-4 Kotoshogiku M13 (2) 4-4 Kaisei M14 Nishikigi 1-7 (5) (5) 1-4-3 Tsurugisho M15 Chiyomaru 5-3 (2) (3) 4-4 Azumaryu M16 Shimanoumi 4-4 (3) (4) 3-5 Meisei M17 Daiamami 3-5 (5) (2) 6-2 Kotonowaka M18 --- (5) 3-5 Kotoyuki J1 Hidenoumi 3-5 (5) (6) 3-5 Chiyoshoma J2 Wakatakakage 5-3 (4) (3) 6-2 Terunofuji J3 Daishoho 4-4 (5) (5) 5-3 Tobizaru J4 Daishomaru 2-6 (~) (3) 7-1 Kotoeko J5 Kyokushuho 4-4 (6) (5) 6-2 Kotoshoho J6 J7 Churanoumi 4-4 (7) (7) 5-3 Kyokutaisei J8 Ichinojo 4-4 (~) J9 Hoshoryu 5-3 (7) Sidelined Tomokaze will be the first demotion from juryo, and a pair of rikishi at opposite ends of their career appear likely to be joining him: Another demotion probably won't be a surprise for veteran Akiseyama, while Asagyokusei unfortunately just doesn't quite seem to be juryo worthy in his skills (yet), occasional flashes of brilliance like yesterday's win over Chiyootori notwithstanding. Sekitori debutant Midorifuji started off well with two wins, but a four-day losing streak quickly turned that around. He's in some danger at 3-5, as is Yago who looks a bit better than he did in his recent pair of 4-11 records, but perhaps not enough to avoid a trip to the unpaid ranks. Down in makushita the top 6 active rikishi all stand at 2-2 or better, for what holds the promise of a very suspenseful promotion race. There's been a need for a makushita fill-in for the juryo schedule on all 8 days so far, and somewhat unusually the committee has elected to go rather deep in sourcing the rikishi for that, with everybody between Ms1w and Ms5e getting one bout apiece. The unlikely makushita-joi 4-0 starting record has been produced by Asabenkei this basho. There are no outside contenders for a zensho promotion as the next 4-0 isn't found until Ms17, beyond the top 15 promotion zone. J4 Daishomaru 2-6 (1) J5 J6 Akua 2-6 (2) (2) 2-6 Mitoryu J7 J8 Ichinojo 4-4 (1) (2) 3-5 Kizakiumi J9 (3) 3-5 Yago J10 Takagenji 4-4 (2) (2) 4-4 Wakamotoharu J11 Midorifuji 3-5 (3) (2) 5-3 Hakuyozan J12 Asagyokusei 2-6 (5) (2) 5-3 Chiyonoumi J13 Tomokaze kyujo (x) (2) 6-2 Chiyootori J14 Akiseyama 3-5 (5) kyujo Sokokurai Ms1 Sakigake 2-2 2-2 Toyonoshima Ms2 Kotodaigo 2-2 4-0 Asabenkei Ms3 Fujiazuma 3-1 2-2 Chiyonoo Ms4 Daiseido 0-4 (x) (x) 1-4 Kaito Ms5 Gokushindo kyujo Explanation of symbols used: numbers = wins needed until favourable outcome (getting promoted / not getting demoted) o = favourable outcome achieved x = favourable outcome definitely missed ~ = favourable outcome missed "by the numbers", but still achievable through banzuke luck
  8. Asashosakari

    New ozeki Asanoyama

    Recycling a comment I made on Reddit a couple of days ago when the "it's a questionable promotion" notion came up there as well: There's really nothing left to prove for Asanoyama as far as his ozeki worthiness is concerned. He might still fail as ozeki, as can happen to any promotee to any rank, but what he has demonstrated over the last year makes him no worse a bet to succeed than anybody else that got promoted in recent times.
  9. Asashosakari

    Olympic jungyo 2020

    With the Olympics no longer happening this summer, the special Olympic jungyo two-day event has, naturally, been cancelled. There are no plans to try to stage regular jungyo events in August on short notice instead.
  10. Asashosakari

    Sumo and the Olympics

    Following the news of the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics, yesterday's NSK board of directors meeting addressed the issue of the Kokugikan's intended use as the boxing venue for the event. The directors affirmed that priority would be given to the holding of honbasho and so the arena will be unavailable to the Olympic organizing committee in case the Olympics are rescheduled to a January, May or September date.
  11. Asashosakari

    Basho attendance

    What difference could 8,000-odd people possibly make to TV ratings in a country of 126 million? Even if compared just to the 22 or so million in the Kansai region it's a drop in the bucket. The basho was seen as a potentially good opportunity as far as TV ratings are concerned because people may have fewer things to do in general right now (especially kids), but the would-be live audience being unable to attend was always going to be irrelevant for that.
  12. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    (I noticed later that I didn't say who I'm expecting to be the second sekiwake besides Shodai - unsurprisingly, I'm going to go with Mitakeumi over Daieisho.) And time to finally close things out for the lower divisions as well... Lower division yusho races (Day 13 results with links to video, also as playlist including the playoff): 6-1 Ms22w Kyokusoten (Nakagawa) 7-0 Ms49e Nishikifuji (Isegahama) 7-0 Sd30w Ura (Kise) 7-0 Sd64e Nankairiki (Kise) 6-1 Sd84w Chiyodaigo (Kokonoe) 6-1 Jd15w Nihonyanagi (Onomatsu) 7-0 Jd49e Dewanoryu (Dewanoumi) 6-1 Jd57e Ryubu (Musashigawa) 7-0 Jk22w Shinohara (Fujishima) Rather quick and decisive matches for the most part. Shinohara had no trouble at all with his designated 5-1 pushover Ishihara and clinched the jonokuchi yusho for his banzuke debut. Officially he's still undefeated of course, but he did pick up a loss in maezumo two months ago - he managed to take revenge on that opponent, fellow high school rookie Taiyo, with the slightly higher stakes this time around. Shinohara will be taking the express banzuke elevator to high jonidan as is customary; from what I've seen of him this basho I didn't get the impression that he's quite skilled enough to do the 14-0 double, but maybe he'll surprise me. Dewanoryu-Ryubu also looked about as one would expect when a well-regarded high school newcomer goes against a 21-year-old jonidan regular. The easy win for the new Mongolian turned out to be yusho-clinching in the end after Nihonyanagi - yet another new high schooler with strong expectations - didn't come through against his sandanme opponent, veteran Nankairiki. Very good performance by the youngster anyway, though, against a very tough customer with lots of experience. So, no playoff for the jonidan yusho and no opportunity for Dewanoryu to avenge his January jonokuchi loss against Nihonyanagi, but they might well get the opportunity in their next honbasho appearance: Their respective Jd49e 7-0 and Jd15w 6-1 scores should see both of them moving up to around the Sd50 mark. (On a sidenote: Ryubu will also be making his sandanme debut, after nearly five years in jonidan.) At 32 years of age and coming back from a long-term injury right now, Nankairiki's likely no longer the guy who was a perennial mid-makushita fixture for nearly a decade, but it's probably safe to say that he was still quite under-ranked at Sd64 this basho. His Day 13 win served to set up the same-stable meeting against Ura, who had no issues defeating Chiyodaigo to secure his spot in that playoff. Nankairiki proceeded to demonstrate that familiarity with an opponent's unorthodox style can go a long way, but the clear difference in class served to give Ura the playoff victory and championship in the end. Big moves are afoot for both Kise-beya rikishi, with Nankairiki going back to his pre-injury ceiling around Ms40, while Ura should find himself ranked just outside the makushita top 15, so not in line for an immediate shot at juryo. Typically only 7-0's from Sd25 and above get put into the top 15, and he was a little bit too low for that at Sd30. They could still decide to fudge things in his favour given his makuuchi pedigree, but I doubt they will. It might be for the best anyway if he doesn't try to fast-track himself back to sekitori status. I do have to say that he looks more comfortable on the dohyo to me than he did in his ill-fated first comeback attempt a little over a year ago, which resulted in re-injury to his knee. And finally, the makushita yusho decider - between two rikishi who looked quite evenly matched on paper - turned out to be another match that was finished in short order. A quick deflection of an overcommitted Kyokusoten, and Nishikifuji was the winner. The basho still has to rate as a big success for 27-year-old Kyokusoten, who appears finally capable of breaking out of the mid-makushita range that he's been stuck in for several years. He'll be making his debut in the single-digit ranks next time, somewhere between Ms7e and Ms8w I would expect. 23-year-old Nishikifuji already was that high in the past and even went 5-2 at Ms8w last July, before he got derailed by injury. It'll be a close thing whether or not he gets to jump straight back into the top 5 promotion zone on his 7-0 record, but I suspect he'll need a little more seasoning in any case and isn't a contender for a juryo promotion just yet. I'm sure he's hoping to join stablemate (and same basho debut) Midorifuji in the paid ranks as quickly as possible, of course.
  13. Asashosakari

    New Juryo for Natsu 2020

    (...or for whichever basho that actually is the next to happen) New: none Returning: Asabenkei - Ms3e 6-1, Takasago-beya, Kanagawa, 31 years old, 3rd promotion, back after 11 basho Fujiazuma - Ms3w 5-2, Tamanoi-beya, Tokyo, 32 years old, 3rd promotion, back after 18 basho former maegashira Chiyonoo - Ms4e 5-2, Kokonoe-beya, Kagoshima, 28 years old, 3rd promotion, back after 8 basho former maegashira Too bad for Kotodaigo, but not unexpected.
  14. Asashosakari

    New ozeki Asanoyama

    Since 2015, not 15 years.
  15. Asashosakari

    Sanyaku promotion

    The arguably more tricky part was knowing/remembering that such a post was once made. (Also, I like quoting really old forum content for the added perspective of how long this place has been around. )
  16. Asashosakari

    Sanyaku promotion

  17. Asashosakari

    Retirees after Haru 2020

    Arashio-oyakata doesn't turn 65 until Sunday, they might be waiting for that.
  18. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    And time to wrap things up here... Day 15 (results, text-only results) 13-2 Ye Hakuho 12-3 Yw Kakuryu, M9e Takanosho 11-4 Se Asanoyama, M13w Aoiyama I don't think it's going to be remembered as an all-time great classic, but the yusho-deciding match between the two yokozuna still delivered a worthy finish to Haru basho. And when all was said and done it was a 13-2 championship for Hakuho in this tournament held under highly unusual circumstances - this reminds me of something. It's the senior yokozuna's 44th title, and having just turned 35 years old this month he is now the fourth-oldest makuuchi winner of the post-WWII era, behind only Kyokutenho (37y 8m), Haguroyama (37y 2m), and Chiyonofuji (35y 5m). Kakuryu had to settle for the jun-yusho honours, alongside surprise package Takanosho who closed things out with another impressive victory, this time over sekiwake Shodai. Aoiyama, the Day 12 sole leader, picked up his third straight loss, however, and failed to even finish runner-up in the end. The penultimate bout of the tournament saw the culmination of Asanoyama's push to become ozeki, and while it wasn't very pretty it ended in success for him - weathering Takakeisho's pushing attack Asanoyama eventually managed to get to the ozeki's mawashi and go on the offensive himself, eventually causing Takakeisho to lose his footing and collapse to the clay. Asanoyama finishes his three-basho run with a total of (only) 32 wins, but has also posted four straight double digit records in the joi now, something far from common. The shimpan department wasted no time in declaring his ozeki run complete, and so we'll be seeing it made official by the board of directors less than 24 hours from now. Something that's also far from common is the fact that Asanoyama has not received any sansho for his promotion-clinching performance - since the start of the special prize system in 1947, he is only the 8th new ozeki (out of 72) to miss out. Sansho were instead awarded to runner-up Takanosho (kanto-sho) and to long-time yusho contender Aoiyama (gino-sho), as well as to Onosho (shukun-sho) for his spectacular Day 10 defeat of eventual champion Hakuho. With Asanoyama's promotion to ozeki it also became clear that a second lower sanyaku slot is opening up, so there's now room to accommodate both Daieisho and Mitakeumi. Both ended their Haru campaigns with a loss, Daieisho to Kiribayama (5 straight wins to end it!) and Mitakeumi to Onosho. Another Day 15 loser was komusubi Endo who found himself outgunned by crafty veteran Takarafuji. That was bad news for Endo as it clinched a makekoshi record for him, so he will almost certainly have to vacate his spot in the titled ranks. The likely beneficiary will be Okinoumi who prevailed in a 7-7 decider over low-ranked former ozeki Kotoshogiku. It would be 34-year-old Okinoumi's first sanyaku appearance in three and a half years if it comes to pass; he's got some potential competition in the promotion race by Takanosho, but conventional wisdom says that his 12 wins while ranked at M9 (with a far easier schedule) will be seen in a less favourable light than Okinoumi's 8 wins at M2. Yutakayama will be missing out on sanyaku in any case, but narrowly defeating Chiyomaru on the final day he has still finished kachikoshi in the joi-jin for the first time in his career, a far cry from his first two attempts which ended in 2-13 and 3-10-2 scores two years back. 13-2 Hakuho Y Kakuryu 12-3 7-8 Takakeisho O --- (o) 11-4 Asanoyama S Shodai 8-7 (x) 4-11 Hokutofuji K Endo 7-8 (x) (o) 8-7 Daieisho M1 (?) 8-7 Okinoumi M2 8-7 Yutakayama M3 Mitakeumi 10-5 (o) M4 M5 Onosho 9-6 ... (?) 12-3 Takanosho M9 Another rikishi who clinched a career-best kachikoshi at the last minute is Kagayaki at M6w. His senshuraku victory sent low-ranked Meisei to makekoshi, and the promising youngster may well find himself equipped with a ticket to juryo now, joining Tochiozan, Azumaryu, Daiamami and injured Tsurugisho on the way down. Nishikigi may have avoided that fate after all with a pretty cool tsuridashi victory over Sadanoumi. In juryo pretty much everything went against Terunofuji, who found himself outmuscled by fellow ex-sanyaku Chiyootori, while all other contenders managed to add another win to their tallies, including top-ranked Kotoyuki who benefitted from the withdrawal of his scheduled opponent Hoshoryu. M1 Takayasu 0-5-10 ... M10 Tochiozan 3-12 (x) ... M14 Nishikigi 6-9 (??) (x)1-4-10 Tsurugisho M15 Chiyomaru 7-6-2 (x) 5-10 Azumaryu M16 (?) 7-8 Meisei M17 Daiamami 5-10 (x) M18 --- (o) 8-7 Kotoyuki J1 8-7 Chiyoshoma J2 Wakatakakage 10-5 (o) (?) 10-5 Terunofuji J3 (??)10-5 Tobizaru J4 (?) 11-4 Kotoeko J5 (o) 12-3 Kotoshoho J6 Four demotions and three promotions should be clear, as listed in the table; Kotoyuki and Wakatakakage are returning to the top division, while 20-year-old yusho winner Kotoshoho will be making his debut. It's difficult to tell if Terunofuji or Kotoeko is fourth in line, but it won't matter if Meisei gets dropped. If he survives, I'm inclined to say that Terunofuji gets promoted and Kotoeko does not. Tobizaru also secured a very promotable record, but will find himself unluckily denied unless the banzuke committee decides to overdemote Nishikigi. Chiyoshoma almost certainly won't be moving up and doesn't have a proper promotion claim anyway, but I can't remember too many tournaments where 8 wins from J2e were only good enough for 7th in line to begin with. For reasons of convenience I'll insert the final juryo yusho arasoi here: 12-3 J6e Kotoshoho 11-4 J5e Kotoeko 10-5 J2w Wakatakakage, J3e Terunofuji, J4e Tobizaru The race was over after the first of the potentially three relevant matches, courtesy of Kotoshoho's championship-clinching win over Chiyonoumi. The sole runner-up record was produced by his stablemate Kotoeko in the end, winning over erstwhile contender Hakuyozan (who finished only 9-6 with three straight losses), while Terunofuji fell two wins behind against Chiyootori. Tough match assignment for Chiyonoumi there, and he ended up on a hard-luck makekoshi with that loss. He should still be retaining his juryo slot, however, even with just 7 wins at J13e. Yago's demotion became a certainty with his 11th loss against Hidenoumi in what was a decidedly not pretty end to the Haru basho juryo action. The weird assist he was given by the banzuke committee two months ago ended up being completely for naught. (It's a trivia-worthy series of records now, at least...) The third promotion slot may have changed hands on the final day after Chiyonoo managed to defeat Takagenji. (x) 4-11 Yago J10 J11 J12 Asagyokusei 5-10 (x) J13 Tomokaze kyujo (x) J14 Ms1 Ms2 Kotodaigo 4-3 (?) (o) 6-1 Asabenkei Ms3 Fujiazuma 5-2 (o) (?) 5-2 Chiyonoo Ms4 Ms5 The committee's recent tie-breaker favourite won't help here - both Kotodaigo and Chiyonoo won their seventh bout up in juryo. Consequently I'm going to go with the standard solution and predict that Chiyonoo will be the one who gets to accompany Asabenkei and Fujiazuma back to the paid ranks. Tough luck for Kotodaigo, if so. Both they and we will know soon enough, of course, as the promotions are set to be announced tomorrow. That's it for the sekitori ranks here, I'll finish up the lower division yusho results in a separate post shortly. The NSK's decision to hold the basho ultimately paid off, but it remains to be seen if the situation will be sufficiently stable to do it again in May, with or without an audience...let's hope for the best. As always, thanks for reading and discussing!
  19. Asashosakari

    Hakuho & the Olympics - a dilemma.

    Those potential conflicts only exist with the pre-planned dates of other events though, which may well not be possible to stick to either. In addition, the Olympics are kind of a life-support program for many individual sports. I don't know if e.g. the IAAF would really insist on holding their next athletics world championships in 2021 as scheduled if it meant there's no income and no public exposure from the Olympics for 8 years.
  20. Asashosakari

    Haru 2020 Basho Discussion (SPOILERS)

    In the abstract I agree with all that, but it's still Hakuho he beat, and in pretty highlight reel-worthy fashion. That might well have trumped the pure numbers concerns for the voters.
  21. Asashosakari

    Haru 2020 Basho Discussion (SPOILERS)

    Nishikigi partying like it's 2017 with a late-basho Houdini act again.
  22. Asashosakari

    Long Kachikoshi Streaks - Haru 2020

    Day 14 Four of the five remaining decisions came in, among them two strong majority predictions and two unexpected results: Makuuchi debutant Kotonowaka finally clinched his kachikoshi at the fifth time of asking, while collegiate prospect Tokisakae extended his KK streak at the last minute in makushita. The pair of results that collectively didn't favour us also weren't so good for the rikishi involved, as Toma and Ito fell to makekoshi in sandanme, ending their KK streaks at 5. Nobody scored the full four points today, but the leader did pick up three. What's more, both pursuers were limited to fewer points than that, so we're actually done here: Congratulations, Tenshinhan! Our champion has won his second LKS yusho, exactly four years on from the first. The not quite final standings: Day 14: 17/18 Decisions, TB 11-12 Pos Player Pts TB 1 Tenshinhan 13 12 2 Athenayama 11 16 2 chishafuwaku 11 14 2 Mmikasazuma 11 13 5 Tsuchinoninjin 10 11 6 Pitinosato 10 10 6 Rocks 10 14 6 Sakura 10 13 9 Asashosakari 9 12 10 Holleshoryu 9 14 10 Jejima 9 20 10 Katsunorifuji 9 15 10 Pandaazuma 9 13 10 Ryoshishokunin 9 14 10 wolfgangho 9 13 16 ryafuji 8 15 17 Profomisakari 7 14 18 WAKATAKE 5 11 Lots of players on 9 and 10 points for whom the last competing rikishi (7-7 Yutakayama) could become decisive.
  23. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    And before it's too late, the juryo yusho race through Day 14: 11-3 J6e Kotoshoho 10-4 J3e Terunofuji, J5e Kotoeko 9-5 J2w Wakatakakage, J4e Tobizaru, J8e Kyokutaisei, J8w Ichinojo, J12e Hakuyozan A very juryo-like limp to the finish line with both leader and pursuer losing, both to opponents who were only 7-6 before the bouts (Kyokushuho and Akiseyama respectively). That has unexpectedly opened the yusho door for Terunofuji again after he defeated low-ranked division returnee Wakamotoharu. Hakuyozan had the opportunity as well, but lost for the second straight day (to Tobizaru this time) to squander what was a good shot at the championship at one point. The yusho-deciding matchups, although things could be over after the first one of them: J6e Kotoshoho (11-3) - J13e Chiyonoumi (7-7) J5e Kotoeko (10-4) - J12e Hakuyozan (9-5) J3e Terunofuji (10-4) - J14e Chiyootori (8-6) Also, sandanme do-beya playoff between Ura and Nankairiki later. (I'll fill in the Day 13 results alongside that later.)
  24. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    Alas, the question that's on my mind about pretty much every sumo opinion that Dapeng decides to post.
  25. Asashosakari

    Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Haru 2020

    Correct. Fifteen-bout era: Daikirin Aki 1970 Takanohana Aki 1972 Wakamisugi Hatsu 1977 Musashimaru Hatsu 1994 Takayasu Natsu 2017 (Also Mienoumi Nagoya 1976, but that was an automatic 10-5 repromotion.)