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  1. 23 points
    Official- ex-Hakuhou is taking over Miyagino beya, effective today. The two Oyakatas have switched names today as well. Merits its own thread.
  2. 18 points
    Finally we can complete the meme. Ichinojo joins the club of rikishi who have won hatsu yusho since Takayasu made Ozeki.
  3. 15 points
    I know it's a topic beaten to death, but Shodai's newly returned mojo has to be the best thing that happened this basho. I disagree with the 'henka' or 'Terunofuji has only himself to blame' notions in here. That was incredible swagger. He fully withstood the yokozuna's tachiai charge and then immediately found the perfect timing to pull him to the floor, continuing with a post-bout body language that yelled 'This is a normal Saturday to me'. The flying zabuton at the end was the icing on the cake. Getting nailed right on the head, then tossing it aside like trash as it rested on his neck. To be fair, that zabuton was pretty disrespectful to him as an ozeki, to begin with.
  4. 14 points
    Gagamaru Masaru (Former Komusubi of Kise-Beya) and special guest Amiran Tsikoridze (European Sumo Champion) will talk about and teach sumo! This sumo wrestling seminar is for both for spectators and athletes, alike! TICKETS: CLICK HERE! Hosted by Dallas Sumo Club & Dark Circle Sumo Club - In Collaboration with @Inside Sport Japan
  5. 12 points
    This was the last basho for 43-year-old Aichi native Gorikiyama, who is retiring at his home basho after over 28 years in ozumo. He had to sit out last year's Nagoya basho due to a neck injury, the resulting drop to Jonidan ended a run of 57 consecutive basho in the Sandanme ranks. Perhaps retirement mode kicked in a few weeks ago, as he lost all of his bouts this basho - against opponents who were all born after his ozumo career started. Before leaving for Nagoya, he had a commemorative picture taken with the rest of Takadagawa-beya.
  6. 11 points
    Abi is already fearing Kinbozan - no neck to nodowa! Amazingly, Kinbozan didn't do sumo at all until his first year of university I believe, and until his third year he was downright mediocre. Some of his old bouts may still be online, and they weren't pretty. But then when he came back for his third year, there had been notable improvement, and that fall he made his first individual quarterfinals at a national tournament in Kanazawa (won by Kanzaki incidentally). He closed the year by finishing runner-up in the All Japan Championship, amasumo's most prestigious tournament, and then as a senior went on a tear, going undefeated for the entire 2020 college season until losing to Oshoma in the semis of the tournament to crown student yokozuna. It is this late start and pronounced improvement that make me think he still has more room to grow than your standard 25 year old with a collegiate background - most of whom have been at it for 15-20 years. As mentioned, he is not one of these staight up, towering yotsu rikishi from the mold of Baruto or Kotooshu, but is effective in applying his strength in numerous ways, with thrusting being his preferred method. He does still have some rough spots, but I think should move through juryo fast.
  7. 11 points
  8. 10 points
  9. 10 points
    It’s getting clearer that Shodai’s slow starts are just an Ozeki flex. “I’m so confident in my abilities, I give myself a handicap.” Dude is keeping himself from getting bored.
  10. 9 points
    In December 1971, the Kyokai was discussed in the National Diet for its various issues (connections to the yakuza, health issues, etc), and in response the Kyokai decided to ban middle schoolers from joining. Any middle schoolers who already joined could only participate on weekends in Tokyo (3 bouts per Tokyo basho) until they graduate.
  11. 8 points
    Here are the kimarite statistics for all divisions in this basho, which ended with about a quarter of the banzuke on the sidelines, as for the first time COVID affected a basho in progress. Eleven heya had to withdraw all rikishi after positive tests, resulting in both an absurd number of fusensho and the lowest number of torikumi since the Showa era. However, it can't be said that Makuuchi champion Ichinojo didn't deserve his maiden yusho - he faced the entire sanyaku roster and beat them all except Shodai. Only a late fusensho was a minor slice of luck, and I really doubt Nishikigi would have caused an upset if he had been able to fight. Asashinjo got himself out of trouble at the edge with an ipponzeoi to secure his kachi-koshi on Day 13. That used to be his speciality as a high school judoka, in which he competed at +100kg, but this is the first time he's won with it on the ozumo dohyo. Ashitori appeared four times this basho, with three of them in the Makuuchi division, on consecutive days! The last time there were three ashitori in the top flight was 1995 Hatsu, and Terutsuyoshi is the first to do that individually since Wakabayama, who chalked up four in 1958 Haru. Zubuneri made its first appearance of the year in this basho courtesy of veteran Shosei - it's the sixth zubuneri of his career, but the first in just over seven years. Spare a thought for the yobidashi corps, who had to go up and down with the fusensho banner no less than 117 times due to most of the heya withdrawals, on top of the usual assortment of non-COVID kyujo. (There were 119 fusen bouts - two of them had both rikishi from kyujo heya which resulted in rare double fusenpai) Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the totals. Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage Abisetaoshi 2 0 1 3 1 0 7 0.33% Amiuchi 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0.14% Ashitori 3 0 0 0 1 0 4 0.19% Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Fusen (default) 16 5 23 33 35 7 119 5.57% Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Harimanage 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.09% Hatakikomi 32 15 38 45 48 3 181 8.47% Hikiotoshi 12 4 4 14 15 2 51 2.39% Hikkake 1 1 2 1 1 0 6 0.28% Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.05% Isamiashi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.05% Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kainahineri 0 0 2 1 1 0 4 0.19% Kakenage 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0.09% Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Katasukashi 1 0 3 4 4 1 13 0.61% Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kekaeshi 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0.14% Ketaguri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kimedashi 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.09% Kimetaoshi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.05% Kirikaeshi 0 1 1 2 0 0 4 0.19% Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshikudake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kotehineri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.05% Kotenage 6 3 4 7 11 0 31 1.45% Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Kubihineri 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 0.14% Kubinage 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.09% Makiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nichonage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuridashi 10 9 16 18 22 2 77 3.60% Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.05% Okurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritaoshi 0 1 2 1 7 0 11 0.51% Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Osakate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Oshidashi 65 41 86 145 177 23 537 25.12% Oshitaoshi 9 5 9 15 19 7 64 2.99% Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Shitatedashinage 0 1 6 0 1 0 8 0.37% Shitatehineri 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 0.14% Shitatenage 5 6 6 9 22 0 48 2.25% Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sokubiotoshi 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.09% Sotogake 1 1 0 2 2 1 7 0.33% Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Sukuinage 2 4 4 3 8 3 24 1.12% Susoharai 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tottari 4 0 1 2 2 0 9 0.42% Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsukidashi 13 9 13 23 19 3 80 3.74% Tsukihiza 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.05% Tsukiotoshi 14 6 25 31 34 2 112 5.24% Tsukitaoshi 0 1 3 1 2 2 9 0.42% Tsukite 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0.09% Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsuridashi 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 0.14% Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uchigake 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0.09% Uchimuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Utchari 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0.14% Uwatedashinage 6 5 9 6 5 4 35 1.64% Uwatehineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Uwatenage 11 10 13 22 25 4 85 3.98% Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Watashikomi 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 0.14% Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00% Yorikiri 64 52 81 111 149 21 478 22.36% Yoritaoshi 7 6 26 18 28 7 92 4.30% Zubuneri 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.05%
  12. 8 points
    Gorikiyama's danpatsu-shiki took place on senshuraku, but only a commemorative group shot and a post-danpatsu picture were posted. He notched up more basho in the Sandanme division than anyone else, and his career outlasted that of his older brother by a very long way indeed. Amanoshima had intellectual disabilities in childhood and attended the Oki Special Needs School in Shimane. He aspired to join ozumo but at first devoted himself to wrestling, since his school had no club for that he would instead practice with the club at Okidozen High School. He achieved strong results in national competitions and the Kokutai, attracting the attention of Hakkaku-beya scouts. The shisho (former Yokozuna Hokutoumi) made regular support visits to welfare facilities during his active years and also donated to facilities for the disabled in his home prefecture of Hokkaido, so Amanoshima felt the heya was a good fit. He would often utilise his wrestling skills in bouts and retires with far more ashitori wins than any other rikishi in the available records. His danpatsu-shiki took place last month at Hakkaku-beya, and he has since visited his old school - a picture from that is in the box. Apparently he will return to the world of wrestling in future, in what capacity I don't know. Miyabishin was one of the uchideshi recruited by former Ozeki Miyabiyama at Fujishima-beya, before they branched out to found Futagoyama-beya. His danpatsu-shiki took place last month at the heya.
  13. 8 points
    "The banzuke was made in a fair way. Mitakeumi? The base is the same as usual but I can't say anything until the banzuke is released," said a cryptic Isegahama Oyakata today. I guess that means Mitakeumi remains kadoban for Aki. The reporter is guessing those that got kachikoshi or makekoshi before they pulled out will be ranked according to these records, but those who withdrew before KK/MK will either stay at their ranks or be demoted a rank ." I can't talk about the banzuke specifically as that would mean I would be giving away details. We can discuss this after the banzuke is released on August 29th," he added. When asked if new rules that will address these specific issues will be instated, he answered; "We can't do that..It's the banzuke, after all." It is said that the banzuke is a "living thing", so making precise rules for anything is out of the question, it seems.
  14. 8 points
    Hi there, here are the Final Results of the most recent edition of the Superbanzuke Masters Series: Reigning World Champion Joaoiyama won his third career Green Mawashi with relative ease. He scored more than 60 points in Nagoya. Among his highlight performances are a yusho in Tippspiel, a shared jun-yusho in ISP, and a third place in Hoshitori Game.It's hard to believe, but actually true that veteran Master Gamer Konosato was awarded his first career shukun-sho (he has six kanto-sho already, but - unbelievably - also still no gino-sho). He grabbed two yusho (RotoSumo and Salarycap Sumo), and he also finished 2nd overall with a little more than 50 points.Both the gino-sho and the kanto-sho go to relative newcomer Kajiyanosho. He excelled in both pre-basho games (e.g. a jun-yusho in UDH) and daily games (yusho in Sekitori-Toto). Among eligible players, he also had the most Top 10 records (eight).Congratulations to all the winners! See the full results at Super Banzuke Masters Series (99998271.com) I have also updated the standings of the World Championship. Oskanohana has a leading margin of roughly 20 points (sizable, but not really much) over the rest of the players. Even more excitingly, there are plenty of strong competitors. We already have a total of eleven players in triple digits! See how you stand at SB SUMO GAMES WORLDCHAMPIONSHIP (99998271.com)
  15. 8 points
    Eight years on from the best makuuchi debut in modern sumo history, Ichinojo finally gets his yusho.
  16. 8 points
    Mostly agree, although IMO Terunofuji perhaps betrayed a bit too much impatience in that bout. It's not like him to be caught so off balance that he goes straight to the floor. Methinks it was some combination of seeing both Ichinojō and Takakeishō lose, giving him the chance to seize sole lead, and underestimating Shōdai since the latter hasn't exactly been a tough opponent ever since Terunofuji's return. Rewatching the bout in slow motion (pity no alternate camera angles because of the time crunch), the trouble started straight from the tachiai. Shōdai's upright tachiai means that Terunofuji needs to lean much further forward than against other opponents to get a grip, and Shōdai just exacerbates that problem by twitching his hips backwards to force Terunofuji to lean even further forward to try and get the belt. Then, with fantastic timing, Shōdai executes three things at one go: he pulls with his right hand, dodges to the right, and uses his left hand to break Terunofuji's grip on him (in much the same fashion as Terunofuji himself had previously done against other wrestlers). The combined effect of all three is to cause Terunofuji to lurch forward with no frontal anchor point on Shōdai's belt or Shōdai himself, so Shōdai won't be in the way of Terunofuji's forward momentum. At this point Terunofuji is bent over 90 degrees with a foot in the air. Shōdai completes the collapse by leaning in over Terunofuji's neck and pulling past with both hands, adding to Terunofuji's own momentum to send him out. It's going to be a hoot to say this, but Shōdai made Terunofuji look like a complete amateur in Hakuhōesque fashion. I think we will be seeing Shōdai at degeiko in Miyagino/Magaki-beya sometime in the near future, especially with a good crop of recruits coming up the ranks there. EDIT: Chris has a video of the bout from the jōmen angle so you can see what Shōdai is doing with his right.
  17. 8 points
    Wow, that zabuton was well deserved for Shodai.
  18. 8 points
    The dohyo-iri is not visibly depleted yet, I've seen no speculations about cancelling the basho in the online papers so far, not even the tabloids, and not a word on TV. I only look at Japanese sources of course. This is a professional sports event, people have paid for their tickets and as long as the NSK can provide 50% of the bouts, they won't demand their money back. Outside pressure, government rules is what forces the NSK to act. Slowly getting back to normal means Corona is just a normal illness now, soon only the infected ones will go kyujo, later only those too sick to step onto the dohyo, just as we are used to in sumo. If we'll have four stables out tomorrow, including Isegehama, maybe they cancel, but they could as well go through with it till the end and only have to think about the ranks and not about refunds. Maybe they cancel some awards and save money there as well.
  19. 7 points
    Kinbozan being from Kazakhstan, a country with strong links to eastern Europe from recent Russian heritage but a tradition of turkic steppe culture, I'd be surprised if he compared more easily to European rikishi than Mongolian rikishi. There's a lot more shared culture, history and experience between Mongolia and Kazakhstan than Kazakhstan and Bulgaria.
  20. 7 points
    The last Shonosuke died on the 22nd at home, at the age of 72, of chronic ILD. He retired in 2015 and for 7 years sumo is without a top tate-gyoji. o The Weekly Post had interviewed him 3 days before his death about the Terunofuji-Wakamotoharu disaster (the papers name that as the 2nd worst thing of the basho after the many kyujo). He had no sashi-chigae as tategyoji, neither as Inosuke nor as Shonosuke, only one famous hansoku decision after a mono-ii by Hakuho - a hansoku reversal does not constitute a wrong decision by the gyoji. http://www.news-postseven.com/archives/20220726_1777115.html last bout Haru 2015 oo drop from the dohyo Hatsu 2012 o As Tamajiro Hatsu1989 o
  21. 7 points
    I've been considering the implications of freezing the banzuke (i.e. stick with the current one for Aki), as the cleanest way to avoid a fubar mess. The Nagoya basho happened, but it's not canon: nothing on record. I can just imagine Tokitsukaze-san breaking it to Shodai: "It is what it is. You're still kadoban."
  22. 7 points
    Ooh, good idea. Let the forum members step in. Yusho winner gets bragging rights on here for years.
  23. 7 points
  24. 7 points
    I attended the basho in Nagoya today, I liked the feel of the Aichi Gym for sumo. It is smaller than the Kokugikan, so even the cheapest seats kinda feel closer than anything on the 2nd floor at Ryogoku. A more intimate setting, so to speak. Very nice. Terutsuyoshi actually went for the ashitori again, haha that was great. I always enjoy it when guys try for something fancy or entertaining instead of what actually makes sense (i.e. Akua). Happy that Ichinojo got past Tobizaru, the basho coming down to him and Terunofuji in the end again would be fun, at least for me. The crowd didn't seem that happy with Ichi's win though. Not from today, but Teru vs Hoshoryu yesterday was great, I wish I'd seen that one live haha. Much like Kiribayama, I like the story of Hosh inching closer and closer to beating the Yokozuna on the belt. It'd be great to have a torch passing moment in the future with these two. Let's hope. Abi trying to henka Wakamotoharu of all people to start I didn't enjoy, but his sidestep to win I thought was alright. The crowd was a bit reluctant to start clapping probably because of the henka attempt. Wakatakakage's ozeki run may be over, but hopefully he gets his kachi koshi. Even if he can't get it done this time, it's fine, he's young and injury-free so far, so he can still make it in a year or two. He's been going up the banzuke at a steady pace and improving. Being a sekiwake getting consistent kachi koshi, much like Mitakeumi was for so long, is a good spot. I think he can manage to eke out one win from his remaining matches; he's beaten Takakeisho before and Shodai is still Shodai regardless of how scared of Magaki he is. Speaking of Shodai, I was angry when he beat Ichinojo when he had the lead because I was certain he was gonna turn around and lose to the likes of Shimanoumi and whoever else is having a bad basho in classic Shodai fashion, but since he actually had a good consistent run throughout I'm happy for him. Well done. I haven't seen the replay of Teru and Daieisho yet but, yeah, if Daieisho (or other thrusters) don't get Terunofuji straight from the tachiai it is difficult to beat the Yokozuna.
  25. 7 points
    Talking about Juryo, no one ever noticed Chiyosakae? He's at his Juryo debut at 32 years old and currently in the runner-up group with 7-3. The man passed a lifetime in the nonsalaried ranks and now could even have a chance to grab the second division yusho (an unlikely event, of course. Ryuden appears to have booked it already). Call it a worthy story! I sincerely hope he wins at least another one and get his KK. Such an underdog deserves a few fully paid bashos.