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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/05/20 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    ...and 0.1% birthday wishes. Have a good one!
  2. 1 point
    https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/article/3077600/how-baseball-became-national-japanese-pastime-and-spawned-fans-no-other way off-topic, but an excellent read and old photos.
  3. 1 point
    Former Tokugoyama/Matsuyama has a restaurant "Amami dining Kanmoure" in Tokyo, Okachimachi and recently held an online drinking party with live Amami island songs attached - about 20 took part. http://amamishimbun.co.jp/2020/05/06/24619/ his singing at an old event, then with the guests still in the shop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h03VHddxNCI
  4. 1 point
    Was my post promising, nay, prophesizing there would be no May basho left intact? Asking for a friend..
  5. 1 point
    I agree. Perseverance and fortitude should trump "upholding the dignity of the rank" (which really means "preserving the mystique") in my book.
  6. 1 point
    Just seen episode 5 of James May: Our Man in Japan documentary. In this episode, he visited Kinki University sumo club, watching his translator mate got lifted by students. Saw a bit of Ito-san in this part, James was introduced by the translator to Ito-san. Quite a tribute for me
  7. 1 point
    https://www.amazon.com/62dai-yokozuna-oonokuni-zenkoku-jungyoÌ/dp/4532165687
  8. 1 point
    He’s taken a lot of flak in sumo commentary for that, but I kind of respect his decision to stick it out. Many Yokozuna would drop out after that first four days or when they failed to convert 7 wins into 8 two days in a row. That he turned up on day 5 and day 14 shows a lot of character in my book.
  9. 1 point
    This is Neil Ferguson, epidemiologist. He is the man responsible for the authoritative Imperial College "doomsday" model that predicted millions of deaths in the US and hundreds of thousands in European countries. Countries went into lockdown because his group told them it was the only way to reduce the deaths to merely staggering numbers. After testing positive for the virus in Mid-March, he went into quarantine for two weeks. His married mistress drove across London to visit him on March 30th, and again on April 30th. When the assignations were made public, he stepped down from his position at the UK's Coronavirus Reponse Committee. His mistress says she's done nothing wrong because she's in an "open" marriage.
  10. 1 point
    Chap in the UK involved in policymaking that was sneaking out to shtup his mistress, thus breaking the lockdown.
  11. 1 point
    Taiho gets a new stone monument at Wakanai harbor, where he arrived at age 5 in August 1945, evacuated from his birthplace Sakhalin. A friend from a local fishery processing company payed for the photographic monument. http://www.hokkaido-np.co.jp/article/415531 local NHK vid
  12. 1 point
    This forum is 50% baseless speculation, 10% regular speculation, 20% reporting on sumo, and 20% complaining about the NSK. This thread barely moves the needle.
  13. 1 point
    What would have been the point? As I argued earlier on the forum, a honbasho held in Tokyo is bread and butter for the Kyokai. They could start one tomorrow without much prep. All honbasho use a standard template and timetable, everyone involved lives around the corner and all know their job, and the Kyokai owns the venue. Without spectators it’s even easier. No need to worry about food and beverage logistics or venue security. There was really no value to cancelling it earlier, so why bother?
  14. 1 point
    This is spreading - 2018 Chanko-1 Grand Prix champion chanko Takamaru has a takeout "home chanko" now http://www.chibanippo.co.jp/news/local/688071 He has this restaurant since 1992
  15. 1 point
    Now that the Natsu 2020 banzuke has been published, I've spent some time this week updating my personal database of amateur sumo results. I keep a record of those who have appeared in national level tournaments in primary school and middle school in order to keep track of who has joined Ozumo, and what their highest ranks are. I also have a separate database for high school and college results for amateur sumo banzuke purposes. Below are a list of everyone in my database who have at least reached Juryo, the year group they belong to (Class of ???), as well as their ranking within their year group based on their cumulative primary school and middle school results (not counting any high school or college results as some of them turn pro at 15). They are listed according to their highest Ozumo ranking. "Class of 2012" means that they graduated from middle school in March 2012. East Ozeki 1 - Takakeisho (Class of 2012) (#3) East Sekiwake 1 - Kotoyuki (Class of 2007) (#12) East Sekiwake 1 - Mitakeumi (Class of 2008) (#7) West Komusubi 1 - Onosho (Class of 2012) (#4) West Maegashira 1 - Yutakayama (Class of 2009) (#11) West Maegashira 2 - Meisei (Class of 2011) (#4) West Maegashira 4 - Kagayaki (Class of 2010) (#8) East Maegashira 5 - Daishomaru (Class of 2007) (#1) West Maegashira 7 - Kotoeko (Class of 2007) (#11) East Maegashira 11 - Daiamami (Class of 2008) (#4) West Maegashira 13 - Kotonowaka (Class of 2013) (#11) East Maegashira 15 - Kotoshoho (Class of 2015) (#9) West Juryo 11 - Midorifuji (Class of 2012) (#162) West Juryo 12 - Daiseido (Class of 2008) (#11) West Juryo 12 - Ryuko (Class of 2014) (#3) West Juryo 13 - Gokushindo (Class of 2012) (#32) Comments The Class of 2012 looks really strong don't they, with both Takakeisho and Onosho having sanyaku experience. If you're wondering which two wrestlers were top of such a strong year group, well, one of them is currently in Sandanme, while the other graduated from university last March, having been a very important member of his college sumo team. The following might be an interesting piece of information about new recruits. There are 2478 wrestlers in my primary and middle school database who have already graduated from middle school. As of Natsu 2020. 126 of them have joined Ozumo sometime in their lives (5%), of which 21 have already retired. 16 (as listed above) have reached the paid sekitori ranks at least once in their careers (0.65%). 50 of them have reached Makushita or above (2%). One of them, Nakao Yusei (shikona Yusei) from the Class of 2017, got a 2-1 score in Maezumo and then subsequently retired.
  16. 1 point
    Cue in Tammy Wynette: "Sometimes it's hard to be a button..."
  17. 1 point
    Day 1: HEYA RIKISHI SCORE PERCENT Nishikido 5 2-0 100 Kagamiyama 2 1-0 100 Azumazeki 10 4-1 80 Chiganoura 14 7-2 78 Yamahibiki 14 6-2 75 Hakkaku 27 11-4 73 Kasugano 20 8-4 67 Naruto 7 2-1 67 Nishiiwa 7 2-1 67 Shibatayama 7 2-1 67 Kise 37 14-9 61 Isegahama 23 6-4 60 Dewanoumi 16 6-4 60 Shikoroyama 21 7-5 58 Oitekaze 20 7-5 58 Minezaki 12 4-3 57 Nishonoseki 11 4-3 57 Oguruma 15 5-4 56 Kokonoe 19 8-7 53 Tokitsukaze 15 4-4 50 Miyagino 14 4-4 50 Otake 14 2-2 50 Michinoku 12 1-1 50 Asakayama 11 2-2 50 Minato 9 4-4 50 Izutsu 3 1-1 50 Sadogatake 45 9-10 47 Sakaigawa 24 5-6 45 Takadagawa 22 4-5 44 Fujishima 14 4-5 44 Tagonoura 13 3-4 43 Tatsunami 17 2-3 40 Ounomatsu 15 2-3 40 Onoe 14 4-6 40 Tamanoi 29 7-11 39 Takasago 20 3-5 38 Shikihide 21 2-5 29 Musashigawa 19 2-5 29 Arashio 12 2-6 25 Nakagawa 10 1-3 25 Isenoumi 12 1-4 20 Tomozuna 11 2-8 20 Futagoyama 9 0-4 0 Asahiyama 9 0-2 0 Irumagawa 9 0-2 0 Kataonami 3 0-2 0
  18. 1 point
    After day 15, May 2019, Makuuchi division scores are: (Rikishi have fought 15 bouts except as otherwise stated) Score Rikishi Shikona 15-0 0 - 14-1 0 - 13-2 0 - 12-3 1 Asanoyama 11-4 1 Kakuryu 10-5 7 Tochinoshin, Tamawashi, Abi, Ryuden, Shodai, Meisei, Shimanoumi 9-6 4 Goeido, Takayasu, Mitakeumi, Daishoho 8-7 5 Takarafuji, Tomokaze, Onosho, Shohozan, Kotoeko 7-8 6 Hokutofuji, Endo, Daieisho, Chiyomaru, Sadanoumi, Enho 6-9 7 Aoiyama, Kotoshogiku, Chiyotairyu, Myogiryu, Tochiozan, Yago, Terutsuyoshi 5-10 6 Ichinojo(5-7-3), Okinoumi, Nishikigi, Kagayaki, Ishiura, Chiyoshoma 4-11 2 Yoshikaze, Tokushoryu 3-12 2 Takakeisho(3-4-8), Kaisei(3-5-7) 2-13 0 - 1-14 0 - 0-15 1 Hakuho(0-0-15) After day 15, May 2019, Juryo division scores are: (Rikishi have fought 15 bouts except as otherwise stated) Score Rikishi Shikona 15-0 0 - 14-1 0 - 13-2 1 Takagenji 12-3 0 - 11-4 1 Kotoyuki 10-5 1 Tobizaru 9-6 2 Gagamaru, Tsurugisho 8-7 6 Toyonoshima, Azumaryu, Yutakayama, Daishomaru, Kiribayama, Arawashi 7-8 8 Takanosho, Sokokurai, Hidenoumi, Mitoryu, Chiyonoumi, Aminishiki, Akiseyama, Seiro 6-9 4 Wakatakakage, Kyokushuho, Kyokutaisei, Irodori 5-10 2 Daiamami, Churanoumi 4-11 1 Ikioi 3-12 0 - 2-13 0 - 1-14 0 - 0-15 2 Chiyonokuni(0-0-15), Hakuyozan(0-0-15)
  19. 1 point
    After day 14, May 2019, Makuuchi division scores are: (Rikishi have fought 14 bouts except as otherwise stated) Score Rikishi Shikona 14-0 0 - 13-1 0 - 12-2 1 Asanoyama 11-3 0 - 10-4 3 Kakuryu, Tochinoshin, Tamawashi 9-5 7 Goeido, Abi, Ryuden, Shodai, Meisei, Shimanoumi, Daishoho 8-6 4 Takayasu, Mitakeumi, Takarafuji, Kotoeko 7-7 6 Tomokaze, Onosho, Shohozan, Chiyomaru, Sadanoumi, Enho 6-8 8 Aoiyama, Hokutofuji, Endo, Daieisho, Myogiryu, Tochiozan, Yago, Terutsuyoshi 5-9 5 Kotoshogiku, Chiyotairyu, Okinoumi, Nishikigi, Ishiura 4-10 4 Ichinojo(4-7-3), Yoshikaze, Kagayaki, Chiyoshoma 3-11 3 Takakeisho(3-4-7), Kaisei(3-5-6), Tokushoryu 2-12 0 - 1-13 0 - 0-14 1 Hakuho(0-0-14) After day 14, May 2019, Juryo division scores are: (Rikishi have fought 14 bouts except as otherwise stated) Score Rikishi Shikona 14-0 0 - 13-1 1 Takagenji 12-2 0 - 11-3 0 - 10-4 1 Kotoyuki 9-5 1 Tobizaru 8-6 4 Toyonoshima, Gagamaru, Tsurugisho, Kiribayama 7-7 9 Takanosho, Azumaryu, Yutakayama, Hidenoumi, Daishomaru, Mitoryu, Aminishiki, Arawashi, Seiro 6-8 6 Wakatakakage, Kyokushuho, Sokokurai, Chiyonoumi, Irodori, Akiseyama 5-9 3 Daiamami, Kyokutaisei, Churanoumi 4-10 1 Ikioi 3-11 0 - 2-12 0 - 1-13 0 - 0-14 2 Chiyonokuni(0-0-14), Hakuyozan(0-0-14)
  20. 1 point
    Day 3: HEYA RIKISHI SCORE PERCENT Kagamiyama 2 4-0 100 Izutsu 3 5-1 83 Chiganoura 14 18-8 69 Shikoroyama 21 22-11 67 Naruto 13 5-3 63 Dewanoumi 16 16-10 62 Azumazeki 10 8-5 62 Nishonoseki 11 12-8 60 Michinoku 12 10-7 59 Sadogatake 45 37-28 57 Hakkaku 27 26-20 57 Kasugano 20 21-16 57 Nishikido 5 4-3 57 Oguruma 15 15-12 56 Oitekaze 20 22-18 55 Takasago 20 15-13 54 Yamahibiki 14 13-11 54 Asakayama 11 8-7 53 Fujishima 14 12-11 52 Kokonoe 22 19-18 51 Sakaigawa 24 17-17 50 Isegahama 23 18-18 50 Tatsunami 17 11-11 50 Tokitsukaze 15 12-12 50 Nishiiwa 7 5-5 50 Kise 37 29-31 48 Shikihide 21 12-14 46 Minato 10 6-7 46 Takadagawa 22 14-18 44 Ounomatsu 16 7-9 44 Tamanoi 29 20-27 43 Onoe 15 9-12 43 Otake 14 9-12 43 Tomozuna 11 9-12 43 Minezaki 12 8-11 42 Isenoumi 12 8-11 42 Miyagino 14 9-13 41 Musashigawa 19 10-16 38 Tagonoura 13 7-12 37 Shibatayama 7 4-7 36 Arashio 12 7-13 35 Futagoyama 9 4-8 33 Irumagawa 9 3-7 30 Kataonami 3 1-3 25 Nakagawa 10 3-10 23 Asahiyama 9 3-11 21
  21. 1 point
    Day 2: HEYA RIKISHI SCORE PERCENT Kagamiyama 2 2-0 100 Nishiiwa 7 5-1 83 Chiganoura 14 13-4 76 Izutsu 3 3-1 75 Hakkaku 27 18-10 64 Michinoku 12 7-4 64 Dewanoumi 16 10-6 63 Shikoroyama 21 13-8 62 Sakaigawa 24 15-10 60 Azumazeki 10 6-4 60 Nishikido 5 3-2 60 Kokonoe 22 13-9 59 Nishonoseki 11 7-5 58 Kasugano 20 13-10 57 Yamahibiki 14 8-6 57 Sadogatake 45 24-19 56 Oitekaze 20 15-12 56 Oguruma 15 10-8 56 Minato 10 5-4 56 Asakayama 11 6-5 55 Kise 37 21-19 53 Tamanoi 29 15-15 50 Takasago 20 10-10 50 Fujishima 14 7-7 50 Naruto 13 3-3 50 Takadagawa 22 11-12 48 Shikihide 21 9-10 47 Tokitsukaze 15 8-9 47 Miyagino 14 7-8 47 Isegahama 23 10-12 45 Tatsunami 17 6-8 43 Ounomatsu 16 6-8 43 Otake 14 6-8 43 Shibatayama 7 3-4 43 Tagonoura 13 5-8 38 Minezaki 12 5-8 38 Musashigawa 19 7-12 37 Isenoumi 12 5-9 36 Onoe 15 4-10 29 Arashio 12 4-10 29 Tomozuna 11 4-10 29 Nakagawa 10 2-7 22 Futagoyama 9 2-7 22 Asahiyama 9 2-7 22 Irumagawa 9 1-7 13 Kataonami 3 0-3 0
  22. 1 point
    This is how the dohyo for Natsu Basho 2017 was made First of all the old dohyo has to be smashed and disposed of. From the pictures it looks like only a good portion of the surface is removed. Who knows more? Next step is a topping of fresh clay The outer edge is marked and the dohyo takes shape If i had a hammer Some stomping The bales are prepared. Mats of rice straw are cut into pieces and partially sewn together. Then after a filling with clay, they are sewn shut. That filling with clay was new to me Bringing the dohyo to it's final size and shape and smoothing the surface The slots for the bales are doug out and filled with bales More measuring an clobbering. I love those japanese special tools Completing the sides The funnel is filled whith clay, so it stays in shape during the building process If you wonder, this is where they spit the power water This hole is for the bucket with fresh power water The center hole for the offerings is dug out More smoothing and detailing Lets paint some lines, happy little lines When the dirty work is done the ringside is covered with tatami, next the giant tassels and the curtains are attached to the roof Et voilà, a dohyo. Thanks to @Akinomaki for the pics in his may pics overview. I hope i can expand this thread in the future.
  23. 1 point
    Nagoya Basho 2017 - Chapter 2 -
  24. 1 point
    Nagoya Basho 2017 The roof and the lighting is assembled. Piling up fresh clay Flattening and compressing the surface More pressure Sewing the tawara Mixing gravel to the clay for the tawara. Filling the tawara Tawara ready for action Hammer time! And again: I looove the japanese special tools. Smooth as an android's bottom. Measuring for the tawara. Digging the holes for the tawara. Thanks to @Akinomaki for the pics.
  25. 1 point
    For starters, it's obvious now that Kotooshu is strictly a yotsu-zumo rikishi in spite of his height, long arms and long legs. The orthodox view about such matters (expressed a few times over the years by Andy Adams and Clyde Newton of Sumo World) is that, other things being equal, tall, long-legged rikishi are at a significant disadvantage in yotsu-zumo bouts because their hips are too high and their opponents can get under them and use leverage. Another part of that orthodox view is that tall rikishi in yotsu-zumo battles are often well-advised to use tsuri (lifting) techniques if they know how to do so, but Kotooshu only very rarely picks up an opponent. However, there are other things to consider, being training, technique and raw strength. Kotooshu is a huge man, basically much bigger than most other rikishi, and his weight is due mostly to his natural size rather than to a bunch of extra fat. Hence he has a big advantage in yotsu-zumo battles because of his basic strength advantage, which more than makes up for the fact that he has to make an effort to keep his hips low all the time. The secret to Kotooshu's success this basho was his ability to get a decent belt grip early in his bouts. He had an excellent tachi-ai the whole way, and once he got his belt grip his opponents couldn't handle his power. In any game or sport it's important to be able to learn both from victory and defeat. I feel that Kotooshu has learned a lot from victory this time, that he needs to be alert, pumped-up and aggressive at the tachi-ai to get a good belt grip, and if so, he can beat anyone! Bravo to Kotooshu, a fine example of traditional power yotsu-zumo.