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Recommend me one of your favourite books.


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#1 Bugman

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 21:57

I used to read a lot before i had the internet, it's a poor excuse but i really do feel like i never have any time to just sit down and concentrate, i wish to change that and read something new soon however, and i was wondering if you guys would recommend something special, a book you feel is of great value to you.

Most of my favourite books i did not pick up myself, they were recommended to me, and the advantage i find of reading a recommended book is that it's always something i would not have chosen myself, and often i had my eyes opened to some very interesting things this way.

On the off-chance that anyone else is looking for a reading recommendation i put forward a book called don quijote, it's a fairly well known piece of literature about a man who reads too many books about knights, so many books does he read that he begins to suffer from a madness and ends up believing he himself is a real knight, with his portly and easily led companion Sancho, he sets out in a cruel world to attempt knightly deeds of valour, it is both tragedy and comedy at the same time.

Thank you for any answers received, in the possible event that many recommendations are put forward i shall make a "to read" list and work my way through, it may take me a long time as i am a slow reader but your recommendation will not be wasted i assure you :)

Edited by Bugman, 13 January 2012 - 22:01.

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#2 yorikiried by fate

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 23:24

The City of Dreaming Books

Tristram Shandy

Quite Ugly One Morning
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#3 Bugman

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 23:42

Moby Dick.


I feel proud to say i read this one, it's one of my favourites, took me an age to finish but afforded me an insight into a world i would never have known anything about, was like a window in time.


The City of Dreaming Books

Tristram Shandy

Quite Ugly One Morning


Thanks i'l look these up :)

To truly laugh, you must be able to take your pain and play with it.  -  Charlie Chaplin
 


#4 Jakusotsu

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 06:15

I case you haven't done it already, "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" & sequels by Douglas Adams are a must read in my opinion.
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#5 Itachi

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 07:10

I case you haven't done it already, "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" & sequels by Douglas Adams are a must read in my opinion.


I'll second that.

Also, these books will take much less time to complete as compared to books like Moby Dick. Be prepared for fits of involuntary laughter - few books tickled my funny bones the way these did.

#6 Flohru

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 08:45

Bugman: As you told us that you like Don Quijote I'll strongly recommend Simplicius Simplicissimus to you which is a fascinating novel not unlike Don Quijote in many ways (though it's a pity that you can't read it in German). Also I deduce that Paul Auster could suit you: try Moon Palace, The Invention of Solitude or City of Glass.

As this is a sumo forum I'll recommend The Street of a Thousand Blossoms by Gail Tsukiyama which is a book focusing on WWII and post-WWII Japan with a strong and well written "sumo plot" in it.

Nishinonshima: you seem to be a Conan Doyle fan as well - if you have time (and have not done so yet) read the new Holmes novel by Anthony Horowitz called House of Silk which is a magnificient book that was a complete surprise to me.

There are way too many books (especially detective fiction) I'd like to recommend so I'll just add five more which are "must reads" IMO:

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
The Brothers Karamazov by Dostojewski
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (no kidding)
Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

#7 Bugman

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 10:13

I case you haven't done it already, "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" & sequels by Douglas Adams are a must read in my opinion.


Happy to say all five books are in my collection, i sympathise greatly with Marvin, although i can't say i've ever met any talking doors or lifts that hated me, every single bonsai tree i ever tried to grow killed itself rather than be in my company :( (don't worry all were grown by me from seeds (Sign of approval...) i've never purchased a real bonsai as i rather obviously don't have the skill to keep one alive)

Thank you for the recommendations guys, i have much to get started with now, much appreciated :)

To truly laugh, you must be able to take your pain and play with it.  -  Charlie Chaplin
 


#8 ronnie

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 20:57

Just a word to the wise, YBF also recommended me to "Quite Ugly One Morning". It's a cracking read, but you should be aware that the narrative is largely in Scottish vernacular. Wasn't a problem for me as I am Scottish, but give it a go and you might find that you'll read it again.

I haven't read "Name Of The Rose", but the film version (Sean Connery in the lead part) was very watchable.

Speaking of films, don't be put off by the screen version of "Lord Of The Rings", the books are so much better.

#9 yorikiried by fate

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 21:14

Just a word to the wise, YBF also recommended me to "Quite Ugly One Morning". It's a cracking read, but you should be aware that the narrative is largely in Scottish vernacular. Wasn't a problem for me as I am Scottish, but give it a go and you might find that you'll read it again.


True, but it's palpable. I'm neither Scottish or native English speaker, too.

I haven't read "Name Of The Rose", but the film version (Sean Connery in the lead part) was very watchable.


In comparison to how much they could have screwed up the story, the movie is kinda alright. Nevertheless, far, far away from the depth of the the book. Eco is a very intelligent and learned man and he loves to show it, so while most of his books are worth their while, they tend to be quite demanding. In an interview he once said that many people complained about the tedious first 100 pages of The Name of the Rose. He continued by stating the he interprets it as an act of initiation for the reader. If they make it through the beginning, they are worthy to carry on. The good professor can be a pompous prick at times...

Speaking of films, don't be put off by the screen version of "Lord Of The Rings", the books are so much better.


There's a movie? I doubt it.
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#10 Manekineko

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 21:46

Children's books for all ages:
Watership Down
Roald Dahl's The Witches
The Hobbit (you can't read just LotR and not read Hobbit, really)
Kipling's The Jungle Book

SF and more:
Gene Wolfe's "Book of the New Sun" or anything else
Some of Ian M. Banks perhaps
A sample of Philip K. Dick
George Martin's "Song of Ice and Fire" cycle (aka Game of Thrones, which was the title of the first book, and now of a cable TV series, which is, of course, inferior to the book).

Classics:
Crime and Punishment (though Russians may lose a lot in translation)
Homer's Odyssey (don't let the rhyme scare you)

Manga:
Tezuka, certainly. Adolf ("The tale of three Adolfs") is a good place to start, but if you like SF/fantasy there are several interesting collections of stories. And if you like both SF and Japan, Phoenix is a masterpiece.

Comics:
There are some charming old newspaper comics, such as vintage Popeye, or Tove Jansson's Moomin.

Crime (sort of):
Men who hate women, aka The girl with dragon tattoo, first of the Millennium trilogy. Second is worse and third is OK, but the first is highly recommended.

If you're not averse to women's books, there's Jane Austen. "Pride and prejudice" is most popular, "Emma" is probably the best, "Persuasion" is my favorite.
And if you're not averse to women's books and SF+, there's Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan series (space opera) - my favorite is "Memory", but most of them are a good read. Also by Bujold, "Curse of Chalion" and other books from that fantasy series.

I could go on, but I'd better stop.
Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously.


- Gilbert Keith Chesterton


#11 Bugman

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 00:04

The Hobbit (you can't read just LotR and not read Hobbit, really)


Both the hobbit and the lord of the rings are among my favourite books, i must have read them both 3 or 4 times each :)

A sample of Philip K. Dick


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Classics:
Crime and Punishment (though Russians may lose a lot in translation)


I had the honour of reading this one though i fear i may have missed some of the meaning as i'm sure it was meant to be read by cleverer people than myself, the terrible beating of the poor donkey remains in my memory.

Thanks one and all for your recommendations, i am sure i have enough to go on now for a good year or two :)

To truly laugh, you must be able to take your pain and play with it.  -  Charlie Chaplin
 


#12 Vikanohara

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 00:28

Depends a lot on your taste of course, but books that I have enjoyed reading :

Messiah (Boris Starling)
Storm (Boris Starling)
Wodka (Boris Starling)
Birdman (Mo Hayder)
Jurassic Park (Michael Crichton) -> read the book before I saw the movie
The Eleventh Plague (Baldwin & Marr)
The Name of the Rose (Umberto Eco)
some Agatha Christie & Sherlock Holmes stuff
& even Enrico IV (Luigi Pirandello), a play

Do I need to say Starling is my favourite author ? (Sign of approval...)

Edited by Vikanohara, 15 January 2012 - 00:31.



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