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Osh's Blog


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#51 madorosumaru

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 16:55

OK. That's big disappointment.. Ever since I was small I was sure that was the case and always thought it to be kind of clever of the Japanese to call it a shoe-cream..

The Japanese are never as clever as you, Moti.
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#52 Kintamayama

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 17:57

OK. That's big disappointment.. Ever since I was small I was sure that was the case and always thought it to be kind of clever of the Japanese to call it a shoe-cream..

The Japanese are never as clever as you, Moti.

Ouch.

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#53 kaiguma

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 05:30

Definitely not going there..
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That's okay, I'll go there for you. I happen to know much about the "Order of the Cloth."

This group of young woman has co-opted Osh for their own devices, a diabolical plan to allow woman onto the dohyo. What you see is only a symbolic gesture: only one of the hundreds of clean, pure, unsoiled giant tampons that they have donated for the creation of Osh's Tsuna. Once he wears it onto the dohyo they are certain that their secret portentous omen will lead to the placement of Uchidate as the first civilian non-military Riji. And once she is in place, she will strike down with great vengeance and with furious anger the rule which prohibits women from stepping onto the sacred clay.

The Order is very fanatical and dangerous. I am surprised that the photographer made it out alive. He probably used a secret shu-phone to take that picture. That is, a phone which looks like a cabbage...

EDIT: you see the old man in the background with camera phone poised and ready? Yeah, he's cat food now. They don't mess around.

Edited by kaiguma, 13 July 2008 - 05:32.


#54 Fay

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Posted 07 August 2008 - 07:47

Kotooshu made an update of his blog. Fortunately enough for me he doesn't write much (I am not worthy...).

Osh was in Hiroshima, playing with children, some sumo and curry.

And in his newest entry he seems to have some pieces of Shoki's melons.

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Kotooshu doesn't write much but he put a gallery into his blog with some very old pics, when he was a child and some nice pics from the morning training in Nagoya. Too bad the pics are a bit small.


so here a big pic upload ...

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#55 Orion

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 03:11

You're all wrong. It's Japanese for eclair, and it comes from "shoe-cream"-looks like a shoe filled with cream. The shape is a bit different, but there you have it!
No?

No! Eclair in Japanese is ekurea. エクレア(フランス語:éclair) シュークリーム is cream puff. Japanese cream puffs are so much better than the American version. I make it a point to go to a Japanese bakery for my allotment.

OK, that's a big disappointment.. Ever since I was small I was sure that was the case and always thought it to be kind of clever of the Japanese to call it a shoe-cream..


It's not 'shoe' -- it's 'choux' (pronounced 'shoo') -- French for cabbage, because when it puffs up, that kind of pastry looks (to a Frenchman, presumably) cabbage-shaped. The word was accepted by British confectioners as "choux pastry" -- which is always used for cream puffs -- and got taken into Japanese as 'shoe=choux cream'.

Orion, whose uncle was a professional confectioner


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