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#101 madorosumaru

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 20:57

Ama is a Tough Little Hombre


Ama had 12 wins in Aki Basho, setting up the ozeki challenge in Kyushu. The little guy revealed after the basho that he had overcome various ailments before and during the tournament to complile his personal best record.


Media: You did very well last basho.

Ama: Thanks you very much. I am glad I did well. I was able to move really well throughout the basho. I had made it a goal to win in double digits. I realized how difficult it was to concentrate fully for 15 days.

M: Did you feel gung-ho from before the basho?

A: Actually, I had some stomach problems before the basho which gave me a lot of trouble. I also had a hard time recuperating from keiko fatigue. To make things worse, I felt some pain in my ear but I ignored it and it got really bad. By Day 5, I was running a fever and the side of my face was all swollen. I ended up going to the hospital and was told I had a bad ear infection.

M: Did that affect your performance on the dohyo?

A: It was like I couldn't hear half of what was going on. I felt I was missing out on things. I just didn't feel well as a whole. Also, it really hurt to bite down, so I had to stuff my mouth with gauze when I went on the dohyo.

M: Still you won your personal best 12 bouts and earned your fourth Shukun-Sho. You also were in the yusho race to the very end.

A: I wasn't really thinking of yusho. It was more a matter of "Double Digits" and "One Bout At A Time." However, it was a good learning experience to be involved in the yusho race. It made me realize, once again, what an awesome achievement it is to get a yusho. Up until now, I would be relieved and ease up a bit after getting kachi-koshi, but I was completely focused to the end this basho. As a result, I was physically shot.

M: Which was your most memorable bout?

A: The one against Toyohibiki on senshuraku.

M: You defeated one yokozuna and four ozeki so we were sure it would be one of those bouts.

A: Of course, I was happy to be able to beat a yokozuna and the ozeki, but when I get on the dokyo . . . how should I put it . . . I feel that there isn't any reason why I shouldn't win over those guys. They may be higher on the banzuke but I work just as hard, if not harder, in keiko. Also, I am not a rookie in sanyaku. To what end do I go through the rigorous keiko everyday? That's why I feel that it's not out of the ordinary for me to defeat a yokozuna or ozeki. Well, at least, that's the way I feel.

M: On senshuraku, you had a tachiai like a speeding bullet and you blitzed your opponent out of the ring. We understand you did a Mongolian victory dance in the dressing room.

A: Yeah, that's right. (Laugh) It was because it was such good sumo. I really wanted to finish with a big bang.

M: Even though you won double digits and a second consecutive Gino-Sho in Nagoya, you were visibly upset that you lost on the last day.

A: Yep. To me, the bout on senshuraku is all-important because it connects to the following basho. I am really glad to end this basho on a fine note.
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#102 madorosumaru

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 00:08

I Did It For You, Mom!


By defeating Kotomitsuki on Day 14, Ama has 34 victories in three basho, virtually assuring him of ozeki promotion after the tournament. Sitting in the masu seat watching the glorious happening was Ama's mother, Mygmarsuren. who had traveled from Mongolia for the occasion. As Mickey's body hit the dohyo dirt, she did a high-five with Ama's brother, who was by her side. "I told my son, 'Your father is watching over you from heaven, so do your very best every bout.' I am so happy," she said with a trembling voice.

Hanaregoma Oyakata, head of the shimpan department, said, "We will meet on the 23rd and report our decision to Musashigawa Rijicho." It is believed they will request a board meeting prior to banzuke formulation to officially determine the promotion.

Ama's shisho, Isegahama Oyakata, has already stated that with the promotion there will be a change of shikona. According to insiders, they have boiled it down to two or three possibilities. The new nom de sumo will have something to do with the "Sun."


Ama: "I don't have to sniff at a picture to smell my mom now."
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Edited by madorosumaru, 23 November 2008 - 00:21.

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#103 Asashosakari

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 00:34

Ama's shisho, Isegahama Oyakata, has already stated that with the promotion there will be a change of shikona. According to insiders, they have boiled it down to two or three possibilities. The new nom de sumo will have something to do with the "Sun."

日の富士? (Totally obvious guess and thus probably wrong...)

Edit: Or perhaps one more...日の出富士

Edited by Asashosakari, 23 November 2008 - 00:40.


#104 madorosumaru

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 02:50

Ama's shisho, Isegahama Oyakata, has already stated that with the promotion there will be a change of shikona. According to insiders, they have boiled it down to two or three possibilities. The new nom de sumo will have something to do with the "Sun."

日の富士? (Totally obvious guess and thus probably wrong...)

Edit: Or perhaps one more...日の出富士

According to published reports, possible shikona are:

旭富士 Asahifuji - shisho's shikona
旭馬 Ama - different character for "a"
清国 Kiyokuni - shikona of former Isegahama Beya ozeki

Asahi 旭, of course, means "rising sun"
Kiyokuni has nothing to do with "sun" but is a venerated Isegahama shikona
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#105 Asashosakari

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 06:09

Kiyokuni has nothing to do with "sun" but is a venerated Isegahama shikona

Well, I doubt they could get that cleared with the previous Kiyokuni by Wednesday. Ama might be a yokozuna by the time they manage that, actually...

#106 Manekineko

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 13:30

I vote for Ama with asahi kanji. Sun Horse!
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#107 Kotoviki

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 15:21

I too want him to keep his horse so I would also vote for Rising Sun Horse above the others!

#108 Takamizakura

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 19:20

Plus it'll hopefully mean no drastic change to this design:
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Edited by Takamizakura, 25 November 2008 - 19:21.


#109 madorosumaru

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 04:11

Shisho, I am going to prove that I'm a good gaijin


It was mentioned in an earlier post that Adiya Baasandorj is the first foreign rikishi to join Takanohana Beya. The former dai-yokozuna, now the shisho of the heya, is a firm believer in developing young "tatakiage" rikishi and up to now refused to recruit both gaijin and gakusei prospects.

Being a huge fan of Takanohana, Baasandorj wouldn't take no for an answer. He persisted, begging and cajoling relentlessly. Finally, his coach at the famed Tottori Johoku High intervened and convinced the former yokozuna to take the young man as a deshi.

It is Baasandorj's intention to prove that the shisho made the right choice. According to reports, he has been overwhelming his ani-deshi in keiko from Day 1. Guys like Takaurata and Takaisamu are no match against him. He shows tremendous quickness and strength as he grabs the mawashi and forces his opponents out of the ring. Even Takakiho, who has had experience in makushita, gets thrown all over the dohyo by the newcomer.

It is commonly known that top high school or college rikishi have ability equivalent to makushita. Still, Baasandorj has been impressive. The oyakata seemed pleased but he didn't go overboard, "Well, keiko is keiko. It's different from hon-basho." However, he did add, "I hope the others will get properly stimulated by him. It is clear that he has talent. Now, it is a matter of how we develop him. I think it will be best to emphasize the fundamentals."

Baasandorj said, "Keiko at the pro level is really intense. We do so much shiko and other basic exercises."
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#110 Fay

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 04:23

All the best for Baasandorj.

Overwhelming Takakiho was no big deal during the last months when he was in a bad form. When I went to see keiko at Takanohana Beya in Fukuoka Takakiho could hardly win one match against Takaisamu or Takashoma. Hopefully both rikishi can help one another to make it to sekitori.

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#111 madorosumaru

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:14

Once He Learns More About Sumo, He Will Be Unstoppable


Gagamaru is known for his overwhelming power and forward-moving sumo. This basho, he is 2-0 at his personal-high makushita 13. Sekitorihood is well within reach.

"Last basho, I was able to the tachiai I wanted," he said. "I was using my hands well as I forged ahead. That, in a nutshell, was the reason for my improvement." No one doubts his oshi prowess. However, that alone is not enough if he wants to move higher on the banzuke. His shisho, Kise Oyakata, has advised him, "Get down lower. Take a good look at your opponent before you hit him at the tachiai. If you are not able to complete the oshi attack and end in yotsu, don't get flustered." Gagamaru is undeniably strong. Still, according to the oyakata, "Compared to his upper body, his lower body is weak. That is why he is prone to fall forward so much." To correct that fault, the young prospect works diligently on shiko--hundreds everyday without fail.

Growing up in Tblissi, Georgia, Teimuraz Jugheli was involved in judo and sambo from age 6. By the time he was 16, he had won national junior championships in both these sports. Around that time, he was introduced to sumo. The sports complex where he trained also had a dohyo, and young Teimuraz was intrigued by the guys wearing mawashi and doing strange exercises. The Georgian junior sumo team needed additional members, so he was "drafted" to be a part of the group that went to the junior championships in Osaka. Also on that 2005 team was the future Tochinoshin, whom Teimuraz knew from his judo and sambo days.

Although he had hardly any sumo experience, he took third place in the individual open-weight class and second in the team competition. After the tournament, he stayed in Japan and trained at the Nichidai facilities. He, then, moved into Kise Beya, hoping for an opening to join ozumo.

Those were difficult times. Unfamiliar with the language and customs, he was so homesick that, by his own admission, he was ready to cry. What kept him going was his father's urgings: "Be tough. Be a man."

As Gagamaru, he debuted on the dohyo in November, 2005. He passed through jonokuchi and jonidan in one basho each. By Kyushu Basho in 2006, he was already in makushita. "I hadn't asked my shisho yet, but I had wanted to return home to Georgia with a chonmage after I made makushita," he confided.

However, life took a sad turn. One night, during a storm, the car driven by his father ran into a disabled vehicle that was stopped on the roadside. His father died and his mother, a passenger, was seriously injured. "I had been away from my family for almost a year and half, so I wanted very badly to see them," he said with sadness in his voice. "Just as I was about to go home, he died. I was all alone in Japan. Those were very tough days."

There were times that Gagamaru was close to giving up. What sustained him was these words from his mother, "Your father was so happy that you were doing sumo. He was so looking forward to seeing you as a sekitori. I am sure he is watching over you in heaven."

Gagamaru finally made it home in November, 2007--a year after his father's death. "I thank God for leaving me my mother. I am gambarizing to become a sekitori because of the support from her and my brother. There are three Georgians in ozumo right now and I am the only one who is not a sekitori. That makes me want to work extra hard."

It is his dream to invite his mother and brother to Japan to see him as a sekitori. "I want to be promoted after I learn more about sumo and Japan. I think it's not right to live [and earn a living] in Japan and not know about the country." These are welcome words for the Kyokai and Rijicho. It is only a matter of time before "The Third Man from Georgia" becomes a sekitori in technique, body and spirit.
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#112 madorosumaru

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 22:30

Mongolian Erufubaatar Bayarbat, wrestling under the shikona Sensho, is close to becoming the first sekitori since the inception of the current Shikihide Beya. After compiling a 7-0 record but losing in the ketteisen, Sensho is now at makushita 4, his personal high ranking.

"I was really pleased because it was the first time I had a zensho record," he said. "I was able to do my own sumo from the very outset." Sensho has been a makushita regular for the past four years. His only demotion to sandanme came when he injured his kneecap last July and missed the entire Nagoya Basho. He came back in Aki with a 5-2 basho and followed that with the outstanding one in Kyushu.

It is a famous story that he came to Japan in 2000 with six other Mongolian kids, including Hakuho. They trained at the Settsu Warehouse in Osaka while waiting to be selected by oyakata to join ozumo. Four were eventually picked with three others returning home. Now, one of the boys is a yokozuna and another, Mokonami, is a sekitori. "I would be lying if I said I am not envious of those guys," he admitted. "I don't want to be a loser so I am going to gambarize." It's going to be juryo or bust this year!

It is interesting to note that the two boys selected first by Shikihide Oyakata--Sensho and Taika--are the laggards on the banzuke. Mokonami, in an interview, tells how bad he felt when he was not selected. He would cry himself to sleep until he was finally picked by Tatsunami Oyakata much later. Hakuho, of course, did not have a heya to go to until Kyokushuzan intervened and pleaded with the then-Miyagino Oyakata on the eve of his return home to Mongolia.

The last of the four picked has been the most successful. Then comes Mokonami, who reached juryo three years ago. The two that caught the eye of Shikihide Oyakata are still in makushita. Once again, it shows how difficult it is to assess the future of 15-year-old boys.

Edited by madorosumaru, 16 January 2009 - 16:37.

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#113 madorosumaru

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:54

An internet site conducted a poll on all-time favorite gaijin rikishi. A similar survey was held in Nov. 2007.

In the current poll, retired Ozeki Konishiki narrowly edged Yokozuna Asashoryu for the top spot. The top ten finishers are as follows:


1. Konishiki - 20%
2. Asashoryu - 19%
3. Takamiyama - 15%
4. Musashimaru - 14%
5. Hakuho - 9%
6. Kotooshu - 9%
7. Baruto - 5%
8. Akebono - 4%
9. Harumafuji - 4%
10. Kokkai - 1%


What do these polls tell us? First of all, we need to realize that they are opinion polls directed at the general public, not necessarily sumo fans. Those that have been with Sumo Forum know that the majority of Japanese are familiar with only the top-ranked or most news-worthy rikishi. As such, nine out of the ten are/were sekiwake or above. Even Kokkai, who at 1% is essentially an "Other," has been in sanyaku. The rest of the foreigners, especially the abundant Mongolians on the banzuke, are anonymous and miscellaneous.

Four of the Top Ten, including three of the Top Five, have been long retired. They are from a "Golden Age" of sumo that the average fan recall fondly. #1 Konishiki was always popular as a gigantic curiosity in addition to his undeniable strength and presence on the dohyo. Even retired from Ozumo, he is in the public eye as a "tarento," appearing on TV, often in kiddie shows. It is not surprising that this likable behemoth took the top spot on the list.

Asashoryu, despite all the negative press or maybe because of it, is the "most popular" of the current gaijin. His situation reminds me of a very well-known boxer who said, "I don't care if they come to see me win or lose, just as long as they come . . .." Love him or hate him, he is a lot more interesting than his rival yokozuna, who received less than half his votes.

Kotooshu has dropped from the top position. With his lackluster performance of the past year, "Osh Fever" has definitely cooled. Akebono was never as popular as his Islander colleagues, but his embarrassing foray into K-1/mixed martial arts has clearly tarnished his reputation.

Edited by madorosumaru, 24 January 2009 - 16:28.

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#114 madorosumaru

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 02:34

The Sad Tale of Toranoyama


The world will little note, nor long remember, that among the intai rikishi of Hatsu Basho 2009 was a young sumotori named Toranoyama. And, people will soon forget the little he did during his tenure in Ozumo. He will return to Mongolia and resume his life as Ganbold Batundrah.

But, the young man did once have a dream. He outperformed nearly a hundred others in a tryout set up by the then-Ajigawa Oyakata and arrived in Japan with another youth that was scouted at the same time, Davaanyam Byambadorj. The oyakata gave the former the shikona "Ako" and the latter "Ama"--one a tiger and the other a horse. In pictures from that time, Ako appeared to be the larger of the two and seemed to hold a lot of promise. Scroll to the bottom of Harumafuji page from Isegahama HP. However, Ako got injured in his second year while his "friend" steadily climbed the banzuke ladder. By the time Ama was in makushita, he had a reputation as a comer--a young rikishi who was small but technically brilliant.

The rest of Ama's story is well-known. He is now, of course, the new ozeki Harumafuji. Ako, on the other hand, has been mired in the lower ranks, reaching a high of sandanme 21 in 2006. Last year, when Ajigawa Oyakata took over Isegahama Beya, his shikona was changed to Toranoyama, "Tiger Mountain." Even that didn't help. For most of 2008, he languished in jonidan.

It must have been sheer torture for the young man, watching Ama's progress. It was a matter of time before he couldn't tolerate it any longer. After Kyushu, Ama was promoted to ozeki and became Harumafuji. That was the last straw for the fangless tiger. When he was listed as one of the kyujo rikishi at the outset of Hatsu Basho, it was obvious his sumo career was over.


Note: To get to the Harumafuji page, click on 日馬富士 in the left column.
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#115 Orion

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 03:37


Many thanks for the postings on Sensho and Toranoyama, Madorosumaru. These are the fullest I have seen, esepcially in the account of the young aspirants.
A minor point in each: Sensho's father's name is usually written "Enkhbaatar" though you have his own name "Bayarbat" correct.
And Ajigawa oyakata didn't "take over Isegahama-beya"; strictly speaking he took over the Isegahama name (myoseki), whereupon the name of his heya also changed.

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#116 madorosumaru

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:07

Thank you, Orion. Since I don't speak Mongolian, my source for Sensho's father's name was the remarkable Doitsubase. You are correct about Isegahama Beya. Ajigawa Oyakata acquired the Isegahama myoseki and Ajigawa Beya became Isegahama Beya. The few remaining deshi from the old Isegahama Beya became the disciples of the new Isegahama Oyakata. (Thanks, Asashosakari)

Edited by madorosumaru, 30 January 2009 - 06:46.

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#117 Asashosakari

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:56

You are correct about Isegahama Beya. Ajigawa Oyakata acquired the Isegahama myoseki and Ajigawa Beya became Isegahama Beya. The few remaining deshi from the old Isegahama Beya became the disciples of the new Isegahama Oyakata.

Didn't the two remaining rikishi move to Kiriyama-beya?

#118 madorosumaru

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 06:18

You are correct about Isegahama Beya. Ajigawa Oyakata acquired the Isegahama myoseki and Ajigawa Beya became Isegahama Beya. The few remaining deshi from the old Isegahama Beya became the disciples of the new Isegahama Oyakata.

Didn't the two remaining rikishi move to Kiriyama-beya?

Yes, they did move to Kiriyama Beya.
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#119 Otokonoyama

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 04:37

Mongolian Erufubaatar Bayarbat, wrestling under the shikona Sensho, is close to becoming the first sekitori since the inception of the current Shikihide Beya. After compiling a 7-0 record but losing in the ketteisen, Sensho is now at makushita 4, his personal high ranking.

[snip]

It is interesting to note that the two boys selected first by Shikihide Oyakata--Sensho and Taika--are the laggards on the banzuke. Mokonami, in an interview, tells how bad he felt when he was not selected. He would cry himself to sleep until he was finally picked by Tatsunami Oyakata much later. Hakuho, of course, did not have a heya to go to until Kyokushuzan intervened and pleaded with the then-Miyagino Oyakata on the eve of his return home to Mongolia.

The last of the four picked has been the most successful. Then comes Mokonami, who reached juryo three years ago. The two that caught the eye of Shikihide Oyakata are still in makushita. Once again, it shows how difficult it is to assess the future of 15-year-old boys.

I wonder how many recruiters (the oyakata, their sekitori, and the other trainers) really talk with a boy's school teachers before deciding on whether to accept a potential deshi. From my own observations working in middle schools, a lot of the larger boys at a young age are viewed as more athletic and stronger. But, they may often be coasting in terms of training and motivation because of their early size and strength advantage. By the end of high school, I would guess that it may be easier to see who is motivated and hard working enough to do well at Ozumo keiko. A lot of the big kids do well up to early high school, until the late bloomers catch up in terms of size, or learn to neutralize the size advantage with speed and skill, or both.

#120 madorosumaru

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 00:56

There is going to be one less Mongolian rikishi. It has been reported that juryo Mokonami intends to obtain Japanese citizenship. He submitted his application last January and received approval from the Japanese government in December. Now, he is awaiting the response from Mongolia. "I have also filed the required documents in Mongolia," he said. "I just need the president's okay [sic]. I expect that during this year."

He added, "I made the decision with my future in mind. I want to do my best and remain with the Kyokai [after my active career]." He already has his Japanese name picked out. He will use his oyakata's surname of Ichikawa and the second part of his shikona, Sakae. As for his Mongolian wife and one-year-old daughter, their application will be filed after he completes his process.
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#121 madorosumaru

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 00:58

According to former komusubi and current sumo commentator, Mainoumi, the gaijin rikishi who is most proficient in the Japanese language is newly-promoted sanyaku Kakuryu. "His Japanese is by far the best among the foreign-born sumo wrestlers," said the erstwhile technical wizard.

Kakuryu's shisho, Izutsu Oyakata, agrees, "There was no language barrier for him from the day he arrived in Japan eight years ago. His IQ is amazing. He must have gotten it from his father." The shin-komusubi's dad, Mangaljalav, is a professor at an university in Mongolia. Kakuryu can read and write basic Japanese. "I know all the kana and quite a bit of kanji," he told the press. "I don't have trouble reading the newspapers."

In that case, he can read all the praises heaped upon him by the pundits. He has a reputation now as a superb technician, especially in the art of moro-zashi, a skill mastered by his shisho's father and predecessor, former sekiwake Tsurugamine, who won 10 Gino-sho along with two Kanto-sho during his illustrious career. Tsuru passed the technique down to his son, who was awarded four Gino-sho. Kakuryu is following in their footsteps, winning his second Gino-sho in Osaka.

"Making it to sanyaku was one of my goals when I joined sumo," said the young Mongolian. "But I am not going to rest on my laurels. I am going to maintain the spirit of a challenger and continue to gambarize."


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Posted Image"I am not yet a wooden rooster" - Futabayama

#122 Fay

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 10:36

In that case, he can read all the praises heaped upon him by the pundits. He has a reputation now as a superb technician, especially in the art of moro-zashi, a skill mastered by his shisho's father and predecessor, former sekiwake Tsurugamine, who won 10 Gino-sho along with two Kanto-sho during his illustrious career. Tsuru passed the technique down to his son, who was awarded four Gino-sho. Kakuryu is following in their footsteps, winning his second Gino-sho in Osaka.



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#123 madorosumaru

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 19:11

More praises for Kakuryu. Reports have it that he is not only a hard worker but is also imaginative in his keiko procedures. The other day, he had two opponents on the dohyo simultaneously while he worked on oshi techniques. The workout was sort of a combination of butsukari and suri-ashi.

Kakuryu realized the importance of fundamental footwork when he injured his knee while falling off the dohyo in Kyushu last November. He felt he needed to improve his suri-ahi, saying, "It was a blessing in disguise to have gotten hurt. Otherwise, I still wouldn't know what I had been doing wrong."

The newly-promoted komusubi has a reputation for being the ultimate thinking rikishi. The Mongolians in Ozumo tend to learn Japanese quicker than the other gaijin but Kakuryu is even exceptional among them. His logical and precise explanation to the press of the various objectives of his keiko methods is indicative of an intelligent mind.

His adeptness at getting advantageous mawashi holds off the tachi-ai and the quickness with which he can get into moro-zashi position have impressed even veteran sumo observers. Obviously, these techniques did not come easily. The young rikishi must first know himself well--understand his own weaknesses. Then, he must systematically work on overcoming them.

Currently on Kakuryu's agenda are the twin objectives of improving the impact of his tachi-ai and developing a more forceful tsuppari. Once he accomplishes that, he will get even closer to becoming the rikishi of Fay's expectations.
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#124 madorosumaru

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 22:09

Sokokurai, from Inner Mongolia, finished 4-3 at makushita 4w in Nagoya. Unfortunately, he was not among those promoted to juryo after the basho. Here are some of his comments regarding his performance and his status.

"I learned a lot this basho. First and foremost, I found how important it is to focus on doing your own sumo. Looking at the banzuke, you normally don't get promoted [to juryo] from makushita 4-mai, so before the basho I didn't give it that much of a thought.

"However, [once the basho started], guys started losing big in the lower ranks of juryo, and people around me began saying, "Hey, if you win five bouts, you might make it." After that, I started to think strange thoughts, and for my fourth and fifth bouts, I was so nervous that I couldn't do anything. Once I lost my third bout and realized that I had no chance, I started relaxing and moving much better. I was able to win the last two bouts and eke out a kachi-koshi.

"When you reach the top of makushita, you can't help but get pre-occupied by thoughts of becoming a sekitori. Instead, regardless of where you are on the banzuke, you need to do your own sumo--to do the best of your ability. That is especially true for a guy like me, who is the type that would mull over mistakes long after the bout. As a result, I would overthink, get tense and do the kind of sumo that I would regret. I need to feel good about what I am doing and look forward to doing good sumo.

"Aside from that, I need to be careful about injuries. Of course, keiko is important, but more than that, I have to use my head more and maximize my strengths on the dohyo. It's been six years since I joined sumo. I need to fully utilize all that I have learned in those six years in the pursuit of my goals."
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#125 ilovesumo

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 17:05

He really must get KK this time...
he deserves it. Always a pleasure to see him, as some other luckless mongolians...
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